UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

_________________

FORM 10-K

_________________

(Mark One)
x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
   
  For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012
  OR
o TRANSITIONAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
   
  For the transition period from ________ to ________

Commission File Number 0-26995

________________

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

________________

 

     
South Carolina   57-1079444

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

     

3640 Ralph Ellis Boulevard

Loris, South Carolina

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

29569

(Zip Code)

     

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (843) 756-6333

______________________

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

     

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Not applicable   Not Applicable

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

Common Stock, $.01 par value per share

(Title of Class)

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. o Yes x No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. o Yes x No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. o Yes x No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). o Yes x No

 
 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer  o Accelerated filer  o
Non-accelerated filer  o  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Smaller reporting company x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange
Act. o Yes x No

The estimated aggregate market value of the Common Stock held by non-affiliates (shareholders holding less than 5% of an outstanding class of stock, excluding directors and executive officers) of the Company on June 30, 2012 was $876,379. See Part II, Item 5 of this Form 10-K for information on the market for the Company’s common stock.

There were 3,738,337 shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding on April 22, 2014.

________________________

 

 

2
 

Table of Contents

 

 

PART I
 

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements Explanatory Note

4
Item 1. Business 7
Item 1A. Risk Factors 28
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 41
Item 2. Properties 41
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 41
Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

43
     
PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 44
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 45
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 46
Item 7A.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk  
Item 8. Financial Statement and Supplementary Data 67
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 119
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 119
Item 9B.

Other Information 

119
     
PART III
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 120
Item 11. Executive Compensation 123
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 125
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 125
Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services 

126
     
PART IV
Item 15.

Exhibits, financial statement schedules 

128
     

SIGNATURES 

EXHIBIT INDEX 

 

3
 

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

This Report, including information included or incorporated by reference in this document, contains statements which constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements may relate to our financial condition, results of operation, plans, objectives, or future performance. These statements are based on many assumptions and estimates and are not guarantees of future performance. Our actual results may differ materially from those anticipated in any forward-looking statements, as they will depend on many factors about which we are unsure, including many factors which are beyond our control. The words “may,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “predict,” “project,” “potential,” “believe,” “continue,” “assume,” “intend,” “plan,” and “estimate,” as well as similar expressions, are meant to identify such forward-looking statements. Potential risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ from those anticipated in any forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those described below under Item 1A - Risk Factors and the following:

 

·reduced earnings due to higher credit losses as a result of declining real estate values, increasing interest rates, increasing unemployment, or changes in payment behavior or other factors;
·reduced earnings due to higher credit losses because our loans are concentrated by loan type, industry segment, borrower type, or location of the borrower or collateral;
·our ability to comply with the Consent Order and the Written Agreement with our regulatory authorities and the potential for regulatory actions if we fail to comply;
·our ability to maintain appropriate levels of capital, including levels of capital required by our higher individual minimum capital ratios and under the capital rules implementing Basel III;
·the adequacy of the level of our allowance for loan losses and the amount of loan loss provisions required in future periods;
·results of examinations by our regulatory authorities, including the possibility that the regulatory authorities may, among other things, require us to increase our allowance for loan losses or write down assets;
·the high concentration of our real estate-based loans collateralized by real estate in a weak commercial real estate market;
·increased funding costs due to market illiquidity, increased competition for funding, and/or increased regulatory requirements with regard to funding;
·significant increases in competitive pressure in the banking and financial services industries;
·changes in the interest rate environment which could reduce anticipated margins;
·changes in political conditions or the legislative or regulatory environment, including governmental initiatives affecting the financial services industry;
·general economic conditions, either nationally or regionally and especially in our primary service area, being less favorable than expected, resulting in, among other things, a deterioration in credit quality;
·increased cybersecurity risk, including potential business disruptions or financial losses;
·changes occurring in business conditions and inflation;
·changes in deposit flows;
·changes in technology;
·our current and future products, services, applications and functionality and plans to promote them;
·changes in monetary and tax policies;
·the rate of delinquencies and amount of loans charged-off;
·the rate of loan growth and the lack of seasoning of our loan portfolio;
·adverse changes in asset quality and resulting credit risk-related losses and expenses;
·loss of consumer confidence and economic disruptions resulting from terrorist activities;
·changes in accounting policies and practices;
·our ability to retain our existing customers, including our deposit relationships;
·changes in the securities markets; and
·other risks and uncertainties detailed from time to time in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”).

 

4
 

If any of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or if any of the assumptions underlying such forward-looking statements proves to be incorrect, our results could differ materially from those expressed in, implied or projected by, such forward-looking statements. For information with respect to factors that could cause actual results to differ from the expectations stated in the forward-looking statements, see “Risk Factors” under Part I, Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We urge readers to consider all of these factors carefully in evaluating the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We make these forward-looking statements as of the date of this document and we do not intend, and assume no obligation, to update the forward-looking statements or to update the reasons why actual results could differ from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking statements.

5
 

Explanatory Note

 

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012 is the first Annual Report on Form 10-K filed by HCSB Financial Corporation (the “Company”) with the SEC since the Company filed its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2011 on March 23, 2012. The Company’s most recent Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended September 30, 2012 was filed on November 28, 2012.

 

The delay in filing the Company’s periodic reports resulted primarily from delays in completing the review of the loan loss reserve of Horry County State Bank (the “Bank”), the banking subsidiary of the Company, and obtaining current appraisals for certain parcels of other real estate owned.

 

For a more detailed discussion of the loan loss reserve of the Bank and current appraisals for other real estate owned, see Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report.

 

6
 

PART I

 

Item 1. Business.

 

General Overview

 

HCSB Financial Corporation was incorporated on June 10, 1999 to become a holding company for Horry County State Bank. The Bank is a state chartered bank which commenced operations on January 4, 1988. Our primary market includes Horry County in South Carolina and Columbus and Brunswick Counties in North Carolina. From our 11 branch locations, we offer a full range of deposit services, including checking accounts, savings accounts, certificates of deposit, money market accounts, and IRAs, as well as a broad range of non-deposit investment services. As of December 31, 2012, we had total assets of $469.0 million, net loans of $288.1 million, deposits of $435.9 million and shareholders’ deficit of $11.8 million.

 

Recent Regulatory Developments

 

Consent Order

 

As a result of the recent economic recession, the Bank entered into a Consent Order (the “Consent Order”) with the FDIC and the South Carolina Board of Financial Institutions (the “State Board”) on February 10, 2011. The Consent Order requires the Bank to, among other things, take the following actions: achieve and maintain Total Risk-Based capital at least equal to 10% of risk-weighted assets and Tier 1 capital at least equal to 8% of total assets; reduce the level of the Bank’s classified assets; eliminate all assets or portions of assets classified “Loss” and 50% of those assets classified “Doubtful” in the Bank’s most recent examination report; analyze and assess the Bank’s management and staffing needs to ensure the Bank has qualified management in place as well as the appropriate organizational structure; increase board oversight of the Bank; limit asset growth; eliminate the Bank’s reliance on brokered deposits; ensure the adequacy of the Bank’s allowance for loan and lease losses; formulate and implement a comprehensive financial plan to address profitability, improve income, monitor expenses, and restructure the Bank’s balance sheet; ensure the full implementation of the Bank’s revised written lending and collection policy to provide effective guidance and control over the Bank’s lending function; implement a plan addressing liquidity, contingency funding, and overall balance sheet management; establish an enhanced internal loan review program; correct all violations of law, regulation, and contraventions of policy which are listed in the Bank’s most recent examination report; not extend any additional credit to any borrower who has a loan or other extension of credit from the Bank that has been charged off or classified “Loss” or “Doubtful” and is uncollected; not declare or pay dividends or bonuses without the prior written approval of the FDIC and the State Board; reduce any segment of the Bank’s loan portfolio that is an undue concentration of credit; and supply written progress reports to the FDIC and the State Board.

 

Prior to receipt of the Consent Order, the Bank’s board of directors and management adopted and began executing a proactive and aggressive strategic plan to address the matters described in the Consent Order. The Bank’s board of directors and management have been, and continue to be, keenly focused on executing this plan and have already complied with a number of the requirements of the Consent Order. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report for more discussion of the Consent Order.

7
 

Written Agreement

 

On May 9, 2011, the Company entered into a Written Agreement (the “Written Agreement”) with the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. The Agreement is designed to enhance the Company’s ability to act as a source of strength to the Bank. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report for more discussion of the Written Agreement.

 

Future Operations

 

We have prepared the consolidated financial statements contained in this Report assuming that the Company will be able to continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the discharge of liabilities in the normal course of business for the foreseeable future. However, as a result of recurring losses, as well as uncertainties associated with the Bank’s ability to increase its capital levels to meet regulatory requirements, management has significant concerns about the Company’s ability to maintain certain capital levels and be able to continue in business. Management has discussed these factors and their related plans in Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. The Company has managed to continue its operations throughout 2013 despite being critically undercapitalized. If the Bank is unsuccessful in raising capital and continues to incur losses from operations, the Bank may be placed into receivership by the FDIC and our shareholders will likely lose all of their investment in the Company. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary if we are unable to maintain regulatory capital at certain levels. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Note 2-“Regulatory Matters and Future Operations” to our Consolidated Financial Statements of this Annual Report.

 

Our Strategic Plan

 

As a response to the general economic downturn and to the terms of the Consent Order and the Written Agreement, we adopted a new strategic plan which includes not only a search for additional capital but also a search for a potential merger partner. Approximately $15.6 million in capital would have returned the Bank to “adequately capitalized” and approximately $31.9 million in capital would have returned the Bank to “well capitalized” under regulatory guidelines on a pro forma basis as of December 31, 2012. If we continue to decrease the size of the Bank or return the Bank to profitability, then we could achieve these capital ratios with less additional capital. However, if we suffer additional loan losses or losses in our OREO portfolio, then we would need additional capital to achieve these ratios. There are no assurances that we will be able to raise this capital on a timely basis or at all. If we cannot meet the minimum capital requirements set forth under the Consent Order and return the Bank to a “well capitalized” designation, or if we suffer a continued deterioration in our financial condition, we may be placed into a federal conservatorship or receivership by the FDIC.

 

We have also been taking a number of steps to stabilize the Bank’s financial condition, including steps to reduce expenses, decrease the size of the Bank, and improve asset quality. We believe that with these steps the Bank’s financial condition is stabilizing, which will help the Bank as it continues its efforts to secure a merger partner or raise capital.

 

Decreasing the Bank’s Assets. We reduced the Bank’s total assets from $535.7 million at December 31, 2011 to $469.0 million at December 31, 2012. Total assets at December 31, 2010 were $787.4 million. We believe this approach, in addition to raising new capital and reducing expenses, represents the quickest path to restoring the Bank’s capital levels, returning the Bank to profitability, and facilitating compliance with the terms of the Consent Order and the Written Agreement. We will continue to evaluate strategies for reducing the Bank’s overall asset size, but do not have current plans for any material additional decrease.

 

Enhancing the Credit Quality of the Loan Portfolio. We have aggressively increased our reserves for losses and focused substantial time and effort on managing the liquidation of nonperforming assets. We are working to hold our borrowers accountable for the principal and interest owed. We have initiated workout plans for problem loans that are designed to promptly collect on or rehabilitate those problem loans in an effort to convert them to earning assets, and we are pursuing foreclosure in certain instances. Additionally, we are marketing our inventory of foreclosed real estate, but given that we would likely be required to accept discounted sales prices below appraised value if we tried to dispose of these assets quickly, we have been taking a more measured and deliberate approach with these sales efforts.

 

8
 

As a result of these efforts, we believe credit quality indicators generally showed signs of stabilization during 2012. Primarily as a result of the stabilization and improvement in our loan portfolio, we incurred a net loss of $9.5 million during 2012 compared to a net loss of $29.0 million during 2011.

 

New lending has slowed somewhat due to demand but also due to our focus on restoring the Bank’s financial condition. We remain focused on disciplined underwriting practices and prudent credit risk management. In 2011, we substantially revised our lending policy and credit procedures. We expanded the scope and depth of the initial loan review performed by our loan officers on all loans, and we incorporated more objective measurements in our internal loan analysis which more accurately addresses each borrower’s probability of default.

 

Reducing ADC and CRE Loan Concentrations. As a result of the current economic environment and its impact on acquisition, development and construction and commercial real estate loans, we have substantially curtailed new loans of these types while proactively decreasing the level of these types of loans in our existing portfolio. We have worked to decrease our concentration by various means, including (i) through the normal sale of real estate by borrowers and their resulting repayments of the borrowed funds, (ii) transfers of problem loans to other real estate owned or charge-off if loss is considered confirmed, and (iii) encouraging customers with these types of loans to seek other financing when their loans mature. During the period from December 31, 2009 to December 31, 2012, we were able to decrease the Bank’s total CRE loan portfolio from $262.6 million to $161.3 million, or 38.6%. If the above initiatives do not reduce our concentrations to acceptable levels, we may seek avenues to sell a portion of these types of loans to outside investors.

 

Increasing Operating Earnings. Management is focused on increasing our operating earnings by implementing strategies to improve the core profitability of our franchise. These strategies change the mix of our earning assets while reducing the size of our balance sheet. Specifically, we are reducing the level of nonperforming assets, controlling our operating expenses, improving our net interest margin and increasing fee income. We plan to reduce the amount of our nonperforming assets, which may require us to record additional provisions for loan losses to accomplish within this timeframe. Additionally, we are carefully evaluating all renewing loans in our portfolio to ensure that we are focusing our capital and resources on our best relationship customers.

 

The benefits of reducing the size of our balance sheet include more disciplined loan and deposit pricing going forward, which we believe will result in an improvement in our net interest margin. Additionally, we will seek to expand our net interest margin as our current loans and deposits reprice and renew. We typically seek to put floors, or minimum interest rates, in our variable rate loans at origination or renewal.

 

Focusing on Reducing Noninterest Expenses and Collecting Noninterest Income. We continue to review our noninterest income and noninterest expense categories for potential revenue enhancements and expense reductions. We have implemented several initiatives to help reduce expenses and manage our overhead at an efficient level. To achieve this goal, management and the Board have already reduced compensation expenses by, among other things, eliminating over 50 employment positions, eliminating salary increases and bonuses of any type since December 31, 2009, eliminating employer matching contributions to officer and employee 401(k) accounts and reducing the percentage of health and dental insurance benefits paid by the Bank for all of its employees. In addition, certain of the Bank’s senior officers have accepted salary reductions and forfeited certain retirement benefits and incentive compensation. Management and the Board also determined in 2011, after careful review of hourly customer traffic counts, to reduce the hours of service on Friday afternoons. All of these steps served to enable the Bank to reduce its compensation expenses by over $3.7 million from 2009 to 2012. In addition, the Board has eliminated monthly director fees, and all active directors who had elected to defer their director fees until retirement have forfeited their deferred fees entirely in the aggregate amount of approximately $857 thousand.

 

We have also reduced marketing expenses incurred by the Bank. We closed two branches in January 2012, and we continue to analyze other noninterest expenses for further opportunities for reductions. We believe that reduction of our level of nonperforming assets will also significantly reduce our operating costs.

 

9
 

At the same time, we are focused on enhancing revenues from noninterest income sources, such as service charges, residential mortgage loan originations and fees earned from fiduciary activities, as well as from minimizing waivers of fees for late charges on loans and fees charged for insufficient funds checks presented for payment. We will continue to look for additional strategies to increase fee-based income as we expect that these efforts will help to bolster our noninterest income levels.

 

Location and Service Area

 

Our primary markets include Horry County, South Carolina and Columbus and Brunswick Counties, North Carolina. Many of the banks in these areas are branches of large regional banks. Although size gives the larger banks certain advantages in competing for business from large corporations, including higher lending limits and the ability to offer services in other areas of South Carolina and North Carolina, we believe that there is a void in the community banking market in our market that we successfully fill. We generally do not attempt to compete for the banking relationships of large corporations, but concentrate our efforts on small- to medium-sized businesses, individuals, and farmers.

 

Banking Services

 

We offer a full range of deposit services that are typically available in most banks and savings and loan associations, including checking accounts, NOW accounts, savings accounts, and time deposits of various types, ranging from daily money market accounts to longer-term certificates of deposit. The transaction accounts and time certificates are tailored to our principal market area at rates competitive to those offered in our market area. In addition, we offer certain retirement account services, such as Individual Retirement Accounts. All deposit accounts are insured by the FDIC up to the maximum amount allowed by law (generally, $250,000 per depositor, subject to aggregation rules). We solicit these accounts from individuals, businesses, associations and organizations, and governmental authorities.

 

Lending Activities

 

Presented below are our general lending activities. In accordance with the Bank’s efforts to restructure the balance sheet, the Bank has strictly limited any new lending, particularly with respect to real estate loans.

 

General. We emphasize a range of lending services, including real estate, commercial, agricultural and consumer loans, to individuals and small to medium-sized businesses and professional concerns that are located in or conduct a substantial portion of their business in our market area. The characteristics of our loan portfolio and our underwriting procedures, collateral types, risks, approval process and lending limits are discussed below.

Real Estate Loans. The primary component of our loan portfolio is loans collateralized by real estate, which made up approximately 83.7% of our loan portfolio at December 31, 2012. Mortgage real estate loans were 63.6% of the portfolio. These loans are secured generally by first or second mortgages on residential, agricultural or commercial property and consist of commercial real estate loans and residential real estate loans (but exclude home equity loans, which are classified as consumer loans). Consumer and commercial real estate construction and commercial development loans were 20.1% of the portfolio. These loans are secured by the real estate for which construction is planned and, in many cases, by supplementary collateral.

As discussed above under “Our Strategic Plan - Reducing ADC and CRE Loan Concentrations”, due to concerns regarding the current economic environment and our concentration of commercial real estate loans, which as of December 31, 2012 totaled $161.3 million, or 63.8% of our real estate loans, we have focused on reducing the level of these types of loans in our portfolio.

Commercial Loans. At December 31, 2012, approximately 11.2% of our loan portfolio consisted of commercial loans. Commercial loans consist of secured and unsecured loans, lines of credit, and working capital loans. We make these loans to various types of businesses. Included in this category are loans to purchase equipment, finance accounts receivable or inventory, and loans made for working capital purposes.

10
 

Consumer Loans. Consumer loans made up approximately 2.7% of our loan portfolio at December 31, 2012. These are loans made to individuals for personal and household purposes, such as secured and unsecured installment and term loans, home equity loans and lines of credit, and revolving lines of credit such as overdraft protection. Automobiles and small recreational vehicles are pledged as security for their purchase.

Agricultural Loans. Approximately 2.4% of our loan portfolio consisted of agricultural loans at December 31, 2012. These are loans made to individuals and businesses for agricultural purposes, including loans to finance crop production and livestock operating expenses, to purchase farm equipment, and to store crops. These loans are secured generally by liens on growing crops and farm equipment. Also included in this category are loans to agri-businesses, which are substantially similar to commercial loans, as discussed above.

Underwriting Procedures, Collateral, and Risk. Although we have generally curtailed new lending while we focus on restoring the Bank’s financial condition, we remain focused on disciplined underwriting practices and prudent credit risk management. We use our established credit policies and procedures when underwriting each type of loan. Although there are minor variances in the characteristics and criteria for each loan type, which may require additional underwriting procedures, we generally evaluate borrowers using the following defined criteria:

·Character – we evaluate whether the borrower has sound character and integrity by examining the borrower’s history.
·Capital – we evaluate the borrower’s overall financial strength, as well as the equity investment in the asset being financed.
·Collateral – we evaluate whether the collateral is adequate from the standpoint of quality, marketability, value and income potential.
·Capacity – we evaluate the borrower’s ability to service the debt.
·Conditions – we underwrite the credit in light of the effects of external factors, such as economic conditions and industry trends.

It is our practice to obtain collateral for most loans to help mitigate the risk associated with lending. We generally limit our loan-to-value ratio to 80%. For example, we obtain a security interest in real estate for loans secured by real estate, including construction and development loans, and other commercial loans. For commercial loans, we typically obtain security interests in equipment and other company assets. For agricultural loans, we typically obtain a security interest in growing crops, farm equipment, or real estate. For consumer loans used to purchase vehicles, we obtain appropriate title documentation. For secured loans that are not associated with real estate, or for which the mortgaged real estate does not provide an acceptable loan-to-value ratio, we typically obtain other available collateral such as stocks or savings accounts.

Every loan carries a credit risk, simply defined as the potential that the borrower will not be willing or able to repay the debt. While this risk is common to all loan types, each type of loan may carry risks that distinguish it from other loan types. The following paragraphs discuss certain risks that are associated with each of our loan types.

Each real estate loan is sensitive to fluctuations in the value of the real estate that secures that loan. Certain types of real estate loans have specific risk characteristics that vary according to the type of collateral that secures the loan, the terms of the loan, and the repayment sources for the loan. Construction and development real estate loans generally carry a higher degree of risk than long term financing of existing properties. These projects are usually dependent on the completion of the project on schedule and within cost estimates and on the timely sale of the property. Inferior or improper construction techniques, changes in economic conditions during the construction and marketing period, and rising interest rates which may slow the sale of the property are all risks unique to this type of loan. Residential mortgage loans, in contrast to commercial real estate loans, generally have longer terms and may have fixed or adjustable interest rates.

Commercial loans primarily have risk that the primary source of repayment will be insufficient to service the debt. Often this occurs as the result of changes in economic conditions in the location or industry in which the borrower operates which impact cash flow or collateral value. Consumer loans, other than home equity loan products, are generally considered to have more risk than loans to individuals secured by first or second mortgages on real estate due to dependence on the borrower’s employment status as the sole source of repayment. Agricultural loans carry the risk of crop failure, which adversely impacts both the borrower’s ability to repay the loan and the value of the collateral.

11
 

By following defined underwriting criteria as noted above, we can help to reduce these risks. Additionally we help to reduce the risk that the underlying collateral may not be sufficient to pay the outstanding balance by using appraisals or taking other steps to determine that the value of the collateral is adequate, and lending amounts based upon lower loan-to-value ratios. We also control risks by reducing the concentration of our loan portfolio in any one type of loan.

Loan Approval and Review. Our loan approval policies provide for various levels of officer lending authority. When the amount of aggregate loans to a single borrower exceeds that individual officer’s lending authority, the loan request is considered by an officer with a higher lending limit. Any loan in excess of this lending limit is approved by the directors’ loan committee. We do not make any loans to any of our directors or executive officers unless the loan is approved by a three-fourth’s vote of the board of directors of the Bank and is made on terms not more favorable to such person than would be available to a person not affiliated with us. Aggregate credit in excess of 10% of the Bank’s aggregate capital, surplus, retained earnings, and reserve for loan losses must be approved by a three-fourth’s vote of our Bank’s board of directors.

Residential Mortgage Loans. We offer a variety of residential mortgage lending products, including loans with fixed rates for fifteen and thirty years as well as adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs). Typically, we close these loans with funds provided by a secondary market investor, although we may close them in the Bank’s name under a pre-approved commitment to sell the loans to an investor within a few weeks from the date the loan is closed.

Lending Limits. Our lending activities are subject to a variety of lending limits imposed by federal law. While differing limits apply to certain loan types or borrowers, in general we are subject to a loan-to-one-borrower limit. These limits increase or decrease as our capital increases or decreases. Unless we sell participations in loans to other financial institutions, we are not able to meet all of the lending needs of loan customers requiring aggregate extensions of credit above these limits.

Other Banking and Related Services

 

Other bank services which are in place or planned include cash management services, sweep accounts, repurchase agreements, mobile banking, remote deposit capture, safe deposit boxes, travelers checks, direct deposit of payroll and social security checks, on-line banking and automatic drafts for various accounts. We are associated with a shared network of automated teller machines that may be used by our customers throughout South Carolina and other regions. Two of our non-executive officers are registered representatives of Investment Professionals Inc. (IPI), and they effect transactions in securities and other non-deposit investment products. We also offer MasterCard and VISA credit card services through a third party vendor. We continue to seek and evaluate opportunities to offer additional financial services to our customers.

 

12
 

Competition

 

The banking business is highly competitive. We compete with other commercial banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, and money market mutual funds operating in our service area and elsewhere. According to the FDIC data as of June 30, 2012, there were 24 financial institutions operating in Horry County, 12 financial institutions operating in Brunswick County and 6 financial institutions operating in Columbus County.

 

We believe that our community bank focus, with our emphasis on service to small businesses, individuals, farmers and professional concerns, gives us an advantage in our markets. Nevertheless, a number of these competitors are well established in our service area. Some of the larger financial companies in our markets may have greater resources than we have, which afford them a marketplace advantage by enabling them to maintain numerous locations and mount extensive promotional and advertising campaigns. Additionally, due to their size, many competitors may offer a broader range of products and services as well as better pricing for those products and services than we offer. Banks and other financial institutions with larger capitalization and financial intermediaries that are not subject to bank regulatory restrictions may have larger lending limits that allow them to serve the lending needs of larger customers. Because larger competitors have advantages in attracting business from larger corporations, we do not generally compete for that business. Instead, we concentrate our efforts on attracting the business of individuals and small and medium-size businesses. With regard to such accounts, we generally compete on the basis of customer service and responsiveness to customer needs, the convenience of our branches and hours, and the availability and pricing of our products and services.

 

Employees

 

As of April 15, 2014, we had 104 full-time employees and two part-time employees. We are not a party to a collective bargaining agreement, and we consider our relations with our employees to be good.

13
 

SUPERVISION AND REGULATION

 

Both HCSB Financial Corporation and Horry County State Bank are subject to extensive state and federal banking laws and regulations that impose specific requirements and restrictions on and provide for general regulatory oversight of their operations. These laws and regulations generally are intended to protect depositors and not shareholders. The following summary is qualified by reference to the statutory and regulatory provisions discussed. Changes in applicable laws or regulations may have a material effect on our business and prospects. Our operations may be affected by legislative changes and the policies of various regulatory authorities. We cannot predict the effect that fiscal or monetary policies, economic control, or new federal or state legislation may have on our business and earnings in the future.

 

The following discussion is not intended to be a complete list of all the activities regulated by the banking laws or of the impact of such laws and regulations on our operations. It is intended only to briefly summarize some material provisions.

 

Recent Legislative and Regulatory Developments

 

Markets in the U.S. and elsewhere experienced extreme volatility and disruption beginning in the latter half of 2007. These circumstances have exerted significant downward pressure on prices of equity securities and virtually all other asset classes, and have resulted in substantially increased market volatility, severely constrained credit and capital markets, particularly for financial institutions, and has caused an overall loss of investor confidence. Loan portfolio performances have deteriorated at many institutions resulting from, among other factors, a weak economy and a decline in the value of the collateral supporting their loans. Dramatic slowdowns in the housing industry, due in part to falling home prices and increasing foreclosures and unemployment, have created strains on financial institutions. Many borrowers are now unable to repay their loans, and the collateral securing these loans has, in some cases, declined below the loan balance. In response to the challenges facing the financial services sector, the following regulatory and governmental actions have recently been enacted.

 

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. On July 21, 2010, President Obama signed into law The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) which, among other things, changes the oversight and supervision of financial institutions, includes new minimum capital requirements, creates a new federal agency to regulate consumer financial products and services and implements changes to corporate governance and compensation practices. The Dodd-Frank Act is focused in large part on the financial services industry, particularly bank holding companies with consolidated assets of $50 billion or more, and contains a number of provisions that will affect us, including:

 

·Minimum Leverage and Risk-Based Capital Requirements. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, the appropriate federal banking agencies are required to establish minimum leverage and risk-based capital requirements on a consolidated basis for all insured depository institutions and bank holding companies, which can be no less than the currently applicable leverage and risk-based capital requirements for depository institutions. As a result, the Company and the Bank will be subject to at least the same capital requirements and must include the same components in regulatory capital.

 

·Deposit Insurance Modifications. The Dodd-Frank Act modifies the FDIC’s assessment base upon which deposit insurance premiums are calculated. The new assessment base will equal our average total consolidated assets minus the sum of our average tangible equity during the assessment period. The Dodd-Frank Act also permanently raises the standard maximum insurance amount to $250,000.

 

·Creation of New Governmental Authorities. The Dodd-Frank Act creates various new governmental authorities such as the Financial Stability Oversight Council and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the “CFPB”), an independent regulatory authority housed within the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”). The CFPB has broad authority to regulate the offering and provision of consumer financial products. The CFPB officially came into being on July 21, 2011, and rulemaking authority for a range of consumer financial protection laws (such as the Truth in Lending Act, the Electronic Funds Transfer Act and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, among others) transferred from the Federal Reserve and other federal regulators to the CFPB on that date. The Dodd-Frank Act gives the CFPB authority to supervise and examine depository institutions with more than $10 billion in assets for compliance with these federal consumer laws, although the authority to supervise and examine depository institutions with $10 billion or less in assets, such as the Bank, for compliance with federal consumer laws will remain largely with those institutions’ primary regulators. However, the CFPB may participate in examinations of these smaller institutions on a “sampling basis” and may refer potential enforcement actions against such institutions to their primary regulators. Accordingly, the CFPB may participate in examinations of the Bank, which currently has assets of less than $10 billion. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act permits states to adopt consumer protection laws and regulations that are stricter than those regulations promulgated by the CFPB, and state attorneys general are permitted to enforce consumer protection rules adopted by the CFPB against certain institutions.

 

14
 

The Dodd-Frank Act also authorized the CFPB to establish certain minimum standards for the origination of residential mortgages, including a determination of the borrower’s ability to repay. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, financial institutions may not make a residential mortgage loan unless they make a “reasonable and good faith determination” that the consumer has a “reasonable ability” to repay the loan. The Dodd-Frank Act allows borrowers to raise certain defenses to foreclosure but provides a full or partial safe harbor from such defenses for loans that are “qualified mortgages.” On January 10, 2013, the CFPB published final rules to, among other things, specify the types of income and assets that may be considered in the ability-to-repay determination, the permissible sources for verification, and the required methods of calculating the loan’s monthly payments. Since then the CFPB made certain modifications to these rules. The rules extend the requirement that creditors verify and document a borrower’s “income and assets” to include all “information” that creditors rely on in determining repayment ability. The rules also provide further examples of third-party documents that may be relied on for such verification, such as government records and check-cashing or funds-transfer service receipts. The new rules were effective beginning on January 10, 2014. The rules also define “qualified mortgages”, imposing both underwriting standards (for example, a borrower’s debt-to-income ratio may not exceed 43%) and limits on the terms of their loans. Points and fees are subject to a relatively stringent cap, and the terms include a wide array of payments that may be made in the course of closing a loan. Certain loans, including interest-only loans and negative amortization loans, cannot be qualified mortgages.

 

·Executive Compensation and Corporate Governance Requirements. The Dodd-Frank Act requires public companies to include, at least once every three years, a separate non-binding “say on pay” vote in their proxy statement by which shareholders may vote on the compensation of the company’s named executive officers. In addition, if such companies are involved in a merger, acquisition, or consolidation, or if they propose to sell or dispose of all or substantially all of their assets, shareholders have a right to an advisory vote on any golden parachute arrangements in connection with such transaction (frequently referred to as “say-on-golden parachute” vote). Other provisions of the act may impact our corporate governance. For instance, the act requires the SEC to adopt rules requiring all exchange-traded companies to adopt clawback policies for incentive compensation paid to executive officers in the event of accounting restatements based on material non-compliance with financial reporting requirements.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act also authorizes the SEC to issue rules allowing shareholders to include their own nominations for directors in a company’s proxy solicitation materials. Many provisions of the act require the adoption of additional rules to implement the changes. In addition, the act mandates multiple studies that could result in additional legislative action. Governmental intervention and new regulations under these programs could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Basel Capital Standards. In December 2010, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, an international forum for cooperation on banking supervisory matters, announced the “Basel III” capital standards, which substantially revised the existing recommended capital requirements for banking organizations. Modest revisions were made in June 2011. The Basel III standards operate in conjunction with portions of standards previously released by the Basel Committee and commonly known as “Basel II” and “Basel 2.5.” On June 7, 2012, the Federal Reserve, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (the “OCC”), and the FDIC requested comment on these proposed rules that, taken together, would implement the Basel regulatory capital reforms through what we refer to herein as the “Basel III capital framework.”

 

15
 

On July 2, 2013, the Federal Reserve adopted a final rule for the Basel III capital framework and, on July 9, 2013, the OCC also adopted a final rule and the FDIC adopted the same provisions in the form of an “interim” final rule. The rule will apply to all national and state banks, such as the Bank, and savings associations and most bank holding companies and savings and loan holding companies, which we collectively refer to herein as “covered” banking organizations. Bank holding companies with less than $500 million in total consolidated assets, such as the Company, are not subject to the final rule, nor are savings and loan holding companies substantially engaged in commercial activities or insurance underwriting. The requirements in the rule begin to phase in on January 1, 2015 for covered banking organizations such as the Bank. The requirements in the rule will be fully phased in by January 1, 2019.

 

The rule imposes higher risk-based capital and leverage requirements than those currently in place. Specifically, the rule imposes the following minimum capital requirements:

 

·a new common equity Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 4.5%;
·a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of 6% (increased from the current 4% requirement);
·a total risk-based capital ratio of 8% (unchanged from current requirements); and
·a leverage ratio of 4% (currently 3% for depository institutions with the highest supervisory composite rating and 4% for other depository institutions).

 

Under the rule, Tier 1 capital is redefined to include two components: Common Equity Tier 1 capital and additional Tier 1 capital. The new and highest form of capital, Common Equity Tier 1 capital, consists solely of common stock (plus related surplus), retained earnings, accumulated other comprehensive income, and limited amounts of minority interests that are in the form of common stock. Additional Tier 1 capital includes other perpetual instruments historically included in Tier 1 capital, such as non-cumulative perpetual preferred stock. The rule permits bank holding companies with less than $15 billion in total consolidated assets to continue to include trust preferred securities and cumulative perpetual preferred stock issued before May 19, 2010 in Tier 1 capital, but not in Common Equity Tier 1 capital, subject to certain restrictions. Tier 2 capital consists of instruments that currently qualify in Tier 2 capital plus instruments that the rule has disqualified from Tier 1 capital treatment.

 

In addition, in order to avoid restrictions on capital distributions or discretionary bonus payments to executives, a covered banking organization must maintain a “capital conservation buffer” on top of its minimum risk-based capital requirements. This buffer must consist solely of Tier 1 Common Equity, but the buffer applies to all three measurements (Common Equity Tier 1, Tier 1 capital and total capital). The capital conservation buffer will be phased in incrementally over time, becoming fully effective on January 1, 2019, and will consist of an additional amount of common equity equal to 2.5% of risk-weighted assets.

 

The current capital rules require certain deductions from or adjustments to capital. The final rule retains many of these deductions and adjustments and also provides for new ones. As a result, deductions from Common Equity Tier 1 capital will be required for goodwill (net of associated deferred tax liabilities); intangible assets such as non-mortgage servicing assets and purchased credit card relationships (net of associated deferred tax liabilities); deferred tax assets that arise from net operating loss and tax credit carryforwards (net of any related valuations allowances and net of deferred tax liabilities); any gain on sale in connection with a securitization exposure; any defined benefit pension fund asset (net of any associated deferred tax liabilities) held by a bank holding company (this provision does not apply to a bank or savings association); the aggregate amount of outstanding equity investments (including retained earnings) in financial subsidiaries; and identified losses. Other deductions will be necessary from different levels of capital.

 

Additionally, the final rule provides for the deduction of three categories of assets: (i) deferred tax assets arising from temporary differences that cannot be realized through net operating loss carrybacks (net of related valuation allowances and of deferred tax liabilities), (ii) mortgage servicing assets (net of associated deferred tax liabilities) and (iii) investments in more than 10% of the issued and outstanding common stock of unconsolidated financial institutions (net of associated deferred tax liabilities). The amount in each category that exceeds 10% of Common Equity Tier 1 capital must be deducted from Common Equity Tier 1 capital. The remaining, non-deducted amounts are then aggregated, and the amount by which this total amount exceeds 15% of Common Equity Tier 1 capital must be deducted from Common Equity Tier 1 capital. Amounts of minority investments in consolidated subsidiaries that exceed certain limits and investments in unconsolidated financial institutions may also have to be deducted from the category of capital to which such instruments belong.

 

16
 

Accumulated other comprehensive income (AOCI) is presumptively included in Common Equity Tier 1 capital and could operate to reduce this category of capital. The final rule provides a one-time opportunity at the end of the first quarter of 2015 for covered banking organizations to opt out of much of this treatment of AOCI. The final rule also has the effect of increasing capital requirements by increasing the risk weights on certain assets, including high volatility commercial real estate, mortgage servicing rights not includable in Common Equity Tier 1 capital, equity exposures, and claims on securities firms, that are used in the denominator of the three risk-based capital ratios.

 

The ultimate impact of the rule on the Bank is currently being reviewed and is dependent upon when certain requirements of the rule will be fully phased in. While the rule contains several provisions that would affect the mortgage lending business, at this point we cannot determine the ultimate effect that the rule will have upon our earnings or financial position.

 

Volcker Rule. Section 619 of the Dodd-Frank Act, known as the “Volcker Rule,” prohibits any bank, bank holding company, or affiliate (referred to collectively as “banking entities”) from engaging in two types of activities: “proprietary trading” and the ownership or sponsorship of private equity or hedge funds that are referred to as “covered funds.” On December 10, 2013, our primary federal regulators, the Federal Reserve and the FDIC, together with other federal banking agencies and the SEC and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, finalized a regulation to implement the Volcker Rule. The deadline for compliance with the Volcker Rule is July 21, 2015.

 

Proprietary trading includes the purchase or sale as principal of any security, derivative, commodity future, or option on any such instrument for the purpose of benefitting from short-term price movements or realizing short-term profits. Exceptions apply, however. Trading in U.S. Treasuries, obligations or other instruments issued by a government sponsored enterprise, state or municipal obligations, or obligations of the FDIC is permitted. A banking entity also may trade for the purpose of managing its liquidity, provided that it has a bona fide liquidity management plan. Trading activities as agent, broker or custodian; through a deferred compensation or pension plan; as trustee or fiduciary on behalf of customers; in order to satisfy a debt previously contracted; or in repurchase and securities lending agreements are permitted. Additionally, the Volcker Rule permits banking entities to engage in trading that takes the form of risk-mitigating hedging activities.

 

The covered funds that a banking entity may not sponsor or hold an ownership interest in are, with certain exceptions, funds that are exempt from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940 because they either have 100 or fewer investors or are owned exclusively by “qualified investors” (generally, high net worth individuals or entities). Wholly owned subsidiaries, joint ventures and acquisition vehicles, foreign pension or retirement funds, insurance company separate accounts (including bank-owned life insurance), public welfare investment funds, and entities formed by the FDIC for the purpose of disposing of assets are not covered funds and a bank may invest in them. Most securitizations also are not treated as covered funds.

 

The regulation as issued on December 10, 2013, treated collateralized debt obligations backed by trust preferred securities as covered funds and accordingly subject to divestiture. In an interim final rule issued on January 14, 2014, the agencies exempted collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”) issued before May 19, 2010, that were backed by trust preferred securities issued before the same date by a bank with total consolidated assets of less than $15 billion or by a mutual holding company and that the bank holding the CDO interest had purchased before December 10, 2013, from the Volcker Rule prohibition. We currently do not hold any of the exempted CDOs. This exemption does not extend to CDOs backed by trust-preferred securities issued by an insurance company.

 

17
 

Proposed Legislation and Regulatory Action

 

From time to time, various legislative and regulatory initiatives are introduced in Congress and state legislatures, as well as by regulatory agencies. Such initiatives may include proposals to expand or contract the powers of bank holding companies and depository institutions or proposals to substantially change the financial institution regulatory system. Such legislation could change banking statutes and the operating environment of the Company in substantial and unpredictable ways. If enacted, such legislation could increase or decrease the cost of doing business, limit or expand permissible activities or affect the competitive balance among banks, savings associations, credit unions, and other financial institutions. We cannot predict whether any such legislation will be enacted, and, if enacted, the effect that it, or any implementing regulations, would have on the financial condition or results of operations of the Company. A change in statutes, regulations or regulatory policies applicable to the Company or the Bank could have a material effect on the business of the Company.

 

HCSB Financial Corporation

 

We own 100% of the outstanding capital stock of the Bank, and therefore we are considered to be a bank holding company under the federal Bank Holding Company Act of 1956 (the “Bank Holding Company Act”). As a result, we are primarily subject to the supervision, examination and reporting requirements of the Federal Reserve under the Bank Holding Company Act and its regulations promulgated thereunder. As a bank holding company located in South Carolina, the State Board also regulates and monitors all significant aspects of our operations.

 

Permitted Activities. Under the Bank Holding Company Act, a bank holding company is generally permitted to engage in, or acquire direct or indirect control of more than 5% of the voting shares of any company engaged in, the following activities:

 

·banking or managing or controlling banks;

 

·furnishing services to or performing services for our subsidiaries; and

 

·any activity that the Federal Reserve determines to be so closely related to banking as to be a proper incident to the business of banking.

 

Activities that the Federal Reserve has found to be so closely related to banking as to be a proper incident to the business of banking include:

 

·factoring accounts receivable;

 

·making, acquiring, brokering or servicing loans and usual related activities;

 

·leasing personal or real property;

 

·operating a non-bank depository institution, such as a savings association;

 

·trust company functions;

 

·financial and investment advisory activities;

 

·conducting discount securities brokerage activities;

 

·underwriting and dealing in government obligations and money market instruments;

 

·providing specified management consulting and counseling activities;

 

·performing selected data processing services and support services;

 

18
 
·acting as agent or broker in selling credit life insurance and other types of insurance in connection with credit transactions; and

 

·performing selected insurance underwriting activities.

 

As a bank holding company we also can elect to be treated as a “financial holding company,” which would allow us to engage in a broader array of activities. A financial holding company can engage in activities that are financial in nature or incidental or complementary to financial activities including insurance underwriting, sales and brokerage activities, financial and investment advisory services, underwriting services and limited merchant banking activities. We have not sought financial holding company status, but may elect such status in the future as our business matures. If we were to elect in writing for financial holding company status, each insured depository institution we control would have to be well capitalized, well managed and have at least a satisfactory rating under the Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”) (discussed below).

 

The Federal Reserve has the authority to order a bank holding company or its subsidiaries to terminate any of these activities or to terminate its ownership or control of any subsidiary when it has reasonable cause to believe that the bank holding company’s continued ownership, activity or control constitutes a serious risk to the financial safety, soundness or stability of it or any of its bank subsidiaries.

 

Change in Control. In addition, and subject to certain exceptions, the Bank Holding Company Act and the Change in Bank Control Act, together with regulations promulgated thereunder, require Federal Reserve approval prior to any person or company acquiring “control” of a bank holding company. Control is conclusively presumed to exist if an individual or company acquires 25% or more of any class of voting securities of a bank holding company. Control will be rebuttably presumed to exist unless a person acquires no more than 33% of the total equity of a bank or bank holding company, of which it may own, control or have the power to vote not more than 15% of any class of voting securities.

 

Source of Strength. There are a number of obligations and restrictions imposed by law and regulatory policy on bank holding companies with regard to their depository institution subsidiaries that are designed to minimize potential loss to depositors and to the FDIC insurance funds in the event that the depository institution becomes in danger of defaulting under its obligations to repay deposits. Under policy of the Federal Reserve, a bank holding company is required to serve as a source of financial strength to its subsidiary depository institutions and to commit resources to support such institutions in circumstances where it might not do so absent such policy. Under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 (“FDICIA”), to avoid receivership of its insured depository institution subsidiary, a bank holding company is required to guarantee the compliance of any insured depository institution subsidiary that may become “undercapitalized” within the terms of any capital restoration plan filed by such subsidiary with its appropriate federal banking agency up to the lesser of (i) an amount equal to 5% of the institution’s total assets at the time the institution became undercapitalized, or (ii) the amount which is necessary (or would have been necessary) to bring the institution into compliance with all applicable capital standards as of the time the institution fails to comply with such capital restoration plan.

 

The Federal Reserve also has the authority under the Bank Holding Company Act to require a bank holding company to terminate any activity or relinquish control of a nonbank subsidiary (other than a nonbank subsidiary of a bank) upon the Federal Reserve’s determination that such activity or control constitutes a serious risk to the financial soundness or stability of any subsidiary depository institution of the bank holding company. Further, federal law grants federal bank regulatory authorities additional discretion to require a bank holding company to divest itself of any bank or nonbank subsidiary if the agency determines that divestiture may aid the depository institution’s financial condition.

 

In addition, the “cross guarantee” provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (the “FDIA”) require insured depository institutions under common control to reimburse the FDIC for any loss suffered or reasonably anticipated by the FDIC as a result of the default of a commonly controlled insured depository institution or for any assistance provided by the FDIC to a commonly controlled insured depository institution in danger of default. The FDIC’s claim for damages is superior to claims of shareholders of the insured depository institution or its holding company, but is subordinate to claims of depositors, secured creditors and holders of subordinated debt (other than affiliates) of the commonly controlled insured depository institutions.

 

19
 

The FDIA also provides that amounts received from the liquidation or other resolution of any insured depository institution by any receiver must be distributed (after payment of secured claims) to pay the deposit liabilities of the institution prior to payment of any other general or unsecured senior liability, subordinated liability, general creditor or shareholder. This provision would give depositors a preference over general and subordinated creditors and shareholders in the event a receiver is appointed to distribute the assets of our Bank.

 

Any capital loans by a bank holding company to any of its subsidiary banks are subordinate in right of payment to deposits and to certain other indebtedness of such subsidiary bank. In the event of a bank holding company’s bankruptcy, any commitment by the bank holding company to a federal bank regulatory agency to maintain the capital of a subsidiary bank will be assumed by the bankruptcy trustee and entitled to a priority of payment.

 

Capital Requirements. The Federal Reserve imposes certain capital requirements on the bank holding company under the Bank Holding Company Act, including a minimum leverage ratio and a minimum ratio of “qualifying” capital to risk-weighted assets. These requirements are essentially the same as those that apply to the Bank described below under “Horry County State Bank – Prompt Corrective Action.” Failure to meet minimum capital requirements can initiate certain mandatory and possibly additional discretionary actions by regulators that, if undertaken, could have a direct material effect on the Bank’s financial statements. Under capital adequacy guidelines and the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action, the Bank must meet specific capital guidelines that involve quantitative measures of the Bank’s assets, liabilities, and certain off-balance-sheet items as calculated under regulatory accounting practices. The Bank’s capital amounts and classifications are also subject to qualitative judgments by the regulators about components, risk weightings, and other factors. At December 31, 2012, our Bank was “critically undercapitalized” under the capital requirements as set per bank regulatory agencies.

 

Subject to capital requirements and certain other restrictions, bank holding companies are able to borrow money to make capital contributions to their subsidiary banks, and these loans may be repaid from dividends paid from the subsidiary bank to the bank holding company. The Bank’s ability to pay dividends to us is subject to regulatory restrictions as described below in “Horry County State Bank – Dividends” and also affects our ability to pay dividends. We are also able to raise capital for contribution to the Bank by issuing securities without having to receive regulatory approval, subject to compliance with federal and state securities laws.

 

South Carolina State Regulation. As a South Carolina bank holding company under the South Carolina Banking and Branching Efficiency Act, we are subject to limitations on sale or merger and to regulation by the State Board. We are not required to obtain the approval of the South Carolina Board prior to acquiring the capital stock of a national bank, but we must notify them at least 15 days prior to doing so. We must receive the State Board’s approval prior to engaging in the acquisition of a South Carolina state chartered bank or another South Carolina bank holding company.

 

20
 

Horry County State Bank

 

The Bank operates as a state bank incorporated under the laws of the State of South Carolina and is subject to examination by the State Board. Deposits at the Bank are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the FDIC.

 

The State Board and the FDIC regulate or monitor virtually all areas of the Bank’s operations, including:

 

·security devices and procedures;

 

·adequacy of capitalization and loss reserves;

 

·loans;

 

·investments;

 

·borrowings;

 

·deposits;

 

·mergers;

 

·issuances of securities;

 

·payment of dividends;

 

·interest rates payable on deposits;

 

·interest rates or fees chargeable on loans;

 

·establishment of branches;

 

·corporate reorganizations;

 

·maintenance of books and records; and

 

·adequacy of staff training to carry on safe lending and deposit gathering practices.

 

The State Board requires the Bank to maintain specified capital ratios and imposes limitations on the Bank’s aggregate investment in real estate, bank premises, and furniture and fixtures. The State Board also requires the Bank to prepare quarterly reports on the Bank’s financial condition in compliance with its minimum standards and procedures.

 

All insured institutions must undergo regular on-site examinations by their appropriate banking agency. The cost of examinations of insured depository institutions and any affiliates may be assessed by the appropriate agency against each institution or affiliate as it deems necessary or appropriate. Insured institutions are required to submit annual reports to the FDIC, their federal regulatory agency, and their state supervisor when applicable. The FDIC has developed a method for insured depository institutions to provide supplemental disclosure of the estimated fair market value of assets and liabilities, to the extent feasible and practicable, in any balance sheet, financial statement, report of condition or any other report of any insured depository institution. The FDICIA also requires the federal banking regulatory agencies to prescribe, by regulation, standards for all insured depository institutions and depository institution holding companies relating, among other things, to the following:

 

21
 
·internal controls;

 

·information systems and audit systems;

 

·loan documentation;

 

·credit underwriting;

 

·interest rate risk exposure; and

 

·asset quality.

 

Prompt Corrective Action. As an insured depository institution, the Bank is required to comply with the capital requirements promulgated under the FDIA and the regulations thereunder, which set forth five capital categories, each with specific regulatory consequences. Under these regulations, the categories are:

 

·Well Capitalized — The institution exceeds the required minimum level for each relevant capital measure. A well capitalized institution is one (i) having a total capital ratio of 10% or greater, (ii) having a tier 1 capital ratio of 6% or greater, (iii) having a leverage capital ratio of 5% or greater and (iv) that is not subject to any order or written directive to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure.

 

·Adequately Capitalized — The institution meets the required minimum level for each relevant capital measure. No capital distribution may be made that would result in the institution becoming undercapitalized. An adequately capitalized institution is one (i) having a total capital ratio of 8% or greater, (ii) having a tier 1 capital ratio of 4% or greater and (iii) having a leverage capital ratio of 4% or greater or a leverage capital ratio of 3% or greater if the institution is rated composite 1 under the CAMELS (Capital, Assets, Management, Earnings, Liquidity and Sensitivity to market risk) rating system.

 

·Undercapitalized — The institution fails to meet the required minimum level for any relevant capital measure. An undercapitalized institution is one (i) having a total capital ratio of less than 8% or (ii) having a tier 1 capital ratio of less than 4% or (iii) having a leverage capital ratio of less than 4%, or if the institution is rated a composite 1 under the CAMELS rating system, a leverage capital ratio of less than 3%.

 

·Significantly Undercapitalized — The institution is significantly below the required minimum level for any relevant capital measure. A significantly undercapitalized institution is one (i) having a total capital ratio of less than 6% or (ii) having a tier 1 capital ratio of less than 3% or (iii) having a leverage capital ratio of less than 3%.

 

·Critically Undercapitalized — The institution fails to meet a critical capital level set by the appropriate federal banking agency. A critically undercapitalized institution is one having a ratio of tangible equity to total assets that is equal to or less than 2%.

 

If the FDIC determines, after notice and an opportunity for hearing, that the Bank is in an unsafe or unsound condition, the regulator is authorized to reclassify the Bank to the next lower capital category (other than critically undercapitalized) and require the submission of a plan to correct the unsafe or unsound condition.

 

If a bank is not well capitalized, it cannot accept brokered deposits without prior FDIC approval. In addition, a bank that is not well capitalized cannot offer an effective yield in excess of 75 basis points over interest paid on deposits of comparable size and maturity in such institution’s normal market area for deposits accepted from within its normal market area, or national rate paid on deposits of comparable size and maturity for deposits accepted outside the bank’s normal market area. Moreover, the FDIC generally prohibits a depository institution from making any capital distributions (including payment of a dividend) or paying any management fee to its parent holding company if the depository institution would thereafter be categorized as undercapitalized. Undercapitalized institutions are subject to growth limitations (an undercapitalized institution may not acquire another institution, establish additional branch offices or engage in any new line of business unless determined by the appropriate federal banking agency to be consistent with an accepted capital restoration plan, or unless the FDIC determines that the proposed action will further the purpose of prompt corrective action) and are required to submit a capital restoration plan. The agencies may not accept a capital restoration plan without determining, among other things, that the plan is based on realistic assumptions and is likely to succeed in restoring the depository institution’s capital. In addition, for a capital restoration plan to be acceptable, the depository institution’s parent holding company must guarantee that the institution will comply with the capital restoration plan. The aggregate liability of the parent holding company is limited to the lesser of an amount equal to 5.0% of the depository institution’s total assets at the time it became categorized as undercapitalized or the amount that is necessary (or would have been necessary) to bring the institution into compliance with all capital standards applicable with respect to such institution as of the time it fails to comply with the plan. If a depository institution fails to submit an acceptable plan, it is categorized as significantly undercapitalized.

 

22
 

Significantly undercapitalized categorized depository institutions may be subject to a number of requirements and restrictions, including orders to sell sufficient voting stock to become categorized as adequately capitalized, requirements to reduce total assets, and cessation of receipt of deposits from correspondent banks. The appropriate federal banking agency may take any action authorized for a significantly undercapitalized institution if an undercapitalized institution fails to submit an acceptable capital restoration plan or fails in any material respect to implement a plan accepted by the agency. A critically undercapitalized institution is subject to having a receiver or conservator appointed to manage its affairs and for loss of its charter to conduct banking activities.

 

An insured depository institution may not pay a management fee to a bank holding company controlling that institution or any other person having control of the institution if, after making the payment, the institution would be undercapitalized. In addition, an institution cannot make a capital distribution, such as a dividend or other distribution that is in substance a distribution of capital to the owners of the institution if following such a distribution the institution would be undercapitalized. Thus, if payment of such a management fee or the making of such would cause a bank to become undercapitalized, it could not pay a management fee or dividend to the bank holding company.

 

As of December 31, 2012, the Bank was deemed to be “critically undercapitalized.” As further described under “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” on February 10, 2011, the Bank entered into a Consent Order with the FDIC and the State Board which, among other things, required the Bank to achieve Tier 1 capital at least equal to 8% of total assets and Total Risk-Based capital at least equal to 10% of total risk-weighted assets by July 10, 2011. The Bank did not meet the capital ratios as specified in the Consent Order and, as a result, submitted a revised capital restoration plan to the FDIC on July 15, 2011. The revised capital restoration plan was determined by the FDIC to be insufficient and, as a result, we submitted a further revised capital restoration plan to the FDIC on September 30, 2011. We received the FDIC’s non-objection to the further revised capital restoration plan on December 6, 2011. The Bank is working diligently to increase its capital ratios in order to strengthen its balance sheet and satisfy the commitments required under the Consent Order. The Bank has engaged independent third parties to assist the Bank in its efforts to increase its capital ratios.

 

As further described under “Recent Legislative and Regulatory Initiatives to Address the Financial and Economic Crises – Basel Capital Standards,” the Basel Committee released in June 2011 a revised framework for the regulation of capital and liquidity of internationally active banking organizations. The new framework is generally referred to as “Basel III”. As discussed above, on July 2, 2013, the Federal Reserve adopted a final rule for the Basel III capital framework and, on July 9, 2013, the OCC also adopted a final rule and the FDIC adopted the same provisions in the form of an “interim” final rule. The rule will apply to all national and state banks, such as the Bank, and savings associations and most bank holding companies and savings and loan holding companies, which we collectively refer to herein as “covered” banking organizations. Bank holding companies with less than $500 million in total consolidated assets, such as the Company, are not subject to the final rule, nor are savings and loan holding companies substantially engaged in commercial activities or insurance underwriting. The requirements in the rule begin to phase in on January 1, 2015 for covered banking organizations such as the Bank. The requirements in the rule will be fully phased in by January 1, 2019.

 

23
 

Standards for Safety and Soundness. The FDIA also requires the federal banking regulatory agencies to prescribe, by regulation or guideline, operational and managerial standards for all insured depository institutions relating to: (i) internal controls, information systems, and internal audit systems; (ii) loan documentation; (iii) credit underwriting; (iv) interest rate risk exposure; and (v) asset growth. The agencies also must prescribe standards for asset quality, earnings, and stock valuation, as well as standards for compensation, fees, and benefits. The federal banking agencies have adopted regulations and Interagency Guidelines Prescribing Standards for Safety and Soundness to implement these required standards. These guidelines set forth the safety and soundness standards that the federal banking agencies use to identify and address problems at insured depository institutions before capital becomes impaired. Under the regulations, if the FDIC determines that the Bank fails to meet any standards prescribed by the guidelines, the agency may require the Bank to submit to the agency an acceptable plan to achieve compliance with the standard, as required by the FDIC. The final regulations establish deadlines for the submission and review of such safety and soundness compliance plans.

 

Transactions with Affiliates and Insiders. The Company is a legal entity separate and distinct from the Bank and its other subsidiaries. Various legal limitations restrict the Bank from lending or otherwise supplying funds to the Company or its non-bank subsidiaries. The Company and the Bank are subject to Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and Federal Reserve Regulation W.

 

Section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act places limits on the amount of loans or extensions of credit to, or investments in, or certain other transactions with, affiliates and on the amount of advances to third parties collateralized by the securities or obligations of affiliates. The aggregate of all covered transactions is limited in amount, as to any one affiliate, to 10% of the Bank’s capital and surplus and, as to all affiliates combined, to 20% of the Bank’s capital and surplus. Furthermore, within the foregoing limitations as to amount, each covered transaction must meet specified collateral requirements. The Bank is forbidden from purchasing low quality assets from an affiliate.

The Dodd-Frank Act expanded the definition of affiliate for purposes of quantitative and qualitative limitations of Section 23A of the Federal Reserve Act to include mutual funds advised by a depository institution or its affiliates. The Dodd-Frank Act will apply Section 23A and Section 22(h) of the Federal Reserve Act (governing transactions with insiders) to derivative transactions, repurchase agreements and securities lending and borrowing transactions that create credit exposure to an affiliate or an insider. Any such transactions with affiliates must be fully secured. The current exemption from Section 23A for transactions with financial subsidiaries will be eliminated. The Dodd-Frank Act will additionally prohibit an insured depository institution from purchasing an asset from or selling an asset to an insider unless the transaction is on market terms and, if representing more than 10% of capital, is approved in advance by the disinterested directors.

Section 23B of the Federal Reserve Act, among other things, prohibits an institution from engaging in certain transactions with certain affiliates unless the transactions are on terms substantially the same, or at least as favorable to such institution or its subsidiaries, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with nonaffiliated companies.

 

Regulation W generally excludes all non-bank and non-savings association subsidiaries of banks from treatment as affiliates, except to the extent that the Federal Reserve decides to treat these subsidiaries as affiliates. The regulation also limits the amount of loans that can be purchased by a bank from an affiliate to not more than 100% of the bank’s capital and surplus.

 

The Bank is also subject to certain restrictions on extensions of credit to executive officers, directors, certain principal shareholders, and their related interests. Such extensions of credit (i) must be made on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral requirements, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with unrelated third parties and (ii) must not involve more than the normal risk of repayment or present other unfavorable features.

 

Branching. Under current South Carolina law, the Bank may open branch offices throughout South Carolina with the prior approval of the State Board. In addition, with prior regulatory approval, the Bank is able to acquire existing banking operations in South Carolina. Furthermore, federal legislation permits interstate branching, including out-of-state acquisitions by bank holding companies, interstate branching by banks, and interstate merging by banks. The Dodd-Frank Act removes previous state law restrictions on de novo interstate branching in states such as South Carolina. This change permits out-of-state banks to open de novo branches in states where the laws of the state where the de novo branch to be opened would permit a bank chartered by that state to open a de novo branch.

 

24
 

Anti-Tying Restrictions. Under amendments to the Bank Holding Company Act and Federal Reserve regulations, a bank is prohibited from engaging in certain tying or reciprocity arrangements with its customers. In general, a bank may not extend credit, lease, sell property, or furnish any services or fix or vary the consideration for these on the condition that (i) the customer obtain or provide some additional credit, property, or services from or to the bank, the bank holding company or subsidiaries thereof or (ii) the customer may not obtain some other credit, property, or services from a competitor, except to the extent reasonable conditions are imposed to assure the soundness of the credit extended. Certain arrangements are permissible: a bank may offer combined-balance products and may otherwise offer more favorable terms if a customer obtains two or more traditional bank products; and certain foreign transactions are exempt from the general rule. Bank holding companies and bank affiliates are also subject to anti-tying requirements in connection with electronic benefit transfer services.

 

Community Reinvestment Act. The CRA requires that the FDIC evaluate the record of the Bank in meeting the credit needs of its local community, including low and moderate income neighborhoods. These factors are also considered in evaluating mergers, acquisitions, and applications to open a branch or facility. Failure to adequately meet these criteria could impose additional requirements and limitations on our Bank.

 

The Gramm Leach Bliley Act (the “GLBA”) made various changes to the CRA. Among other changes, CRA agreements with private parties must be disclosed and annual CRA reports must be made available to a bank’s primary federal regulator. A bank holding company will not be permitted to become a financial holding company and no new activities authorized under the GLBA may be commenced by a holding company or by a bank financial subsidiary if any of its bank subsidiaries received less than a satisfactory CRA rating in its latest CRA examination.

 

On May 26, 2011, the date of the most recent examination, the Bank received a satisfactory CRA rating.

 

Finance Subsidiaries. Under the GLBA, subject to certain conditions imposed by their respective banking regulators, national and state-chartered banks are permitted to form “financial subsidiaries” that may conduct financial or incidental activities, thereby permitting bank subsidiaries to engage in certain activities that previously were impermissible. The GLBA imposes several safeguards and restrictions on financial subsidiaries, including that the parent bank’s equity investment in the financial subsidiary be deducted from the bank’s assets and tangible equity for purposes of calculating the bank’s capital adequacy. In addition, the GLBA imposes new restrictions on transactions between a bank and its financial subsidiaries similar to restrictions applicable to transactions between banks and non-bank affiliates. As of December 31, 2012, the Company did not have any financial subsidiaries.

 

Consumer Protection Regulations. Activities of the Bank are subject to a variety of statutes and regulations designed to protect consumers. Interest and other charges collected or contracted for by the Bank are subject to state usury laws and federal laws concerning interest rates. The Bank’s loan operations are also subject to federal laws applicable to credit transactions such as:

 

·The federal Truth-In-Lending Act, governing disclosures of credit terms to consumer borrowers;

 

·The Home Mortgage Disclosure Act of 1975, requiring financial institutions to provide information to enable the public and public officials to determine whether a financial institution is fulfilling its obligation to help meet the housing needs of the community it serves;

 

·The Equal Credit Opportunity Act, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, creed or other prohibited factors in extending credit;

 

·The Fair Credit Reporting Act of 1978, as amended by the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act, governing the use and provision of information to credit reporting agencies, certain identity theft protections and certain credit and other disclosures;

 

25
 
·The Fair Debt Collection Act, governing the manner in which consumer debts may be collected by collection agencies;

 

·The Credit Card Accountability, Responsibility, and Disclosure Act of 2009, governing interest rate increases and fee limits; and

 

·The Rules and regulations of the various federal agencies charged with the responsibility of implementing these federal laws.

 

The deposit operations of the Bank also are subject to:

 

·the Right to Financial Privacy Act, which imposes a duty to maintain confidentiality of consumer financial records and prescribes procedures for complying with administrative subpoenas of financial records; and

 

·the Electronic Funds Transfer Act and Regulation E issued by the Federal Reserve Board to implement that Act, which governs automatic deposits to and withdrawals from deposit accounts and customers’ rights and liabilities arising from the use of automated teller machines and other electronic banking services.

 

Enforcement Powers. The Bank and its “institution-affiliated parties,” including its management, employees, agents, independent contractors, and consultants such as attorneys and accountants and others who participate in the conduct of the financial institution’s affairs, are subject to potential civil and criminal penalties for violations of law, regulations or written orders of a government agency. These practices can include the failure of an institution to timely file required reports or the filing of false or misleading information or the submission of inaccurate reports. Civil penalties may be as high as $1,000,000 a day for such violations. Criminal penalties for some financial institution crimes have been increased to 20 years. In addition, regulators are provided with greater flexibility to commence enforcement actions against institutions and institution-affiliated parties. Possible enforcement actions include the termination of deposit insurance. Furthermore, banking agencies’ power to issue cease-and-desist orders were expanded. Such orders may, among other things, require affirmative action to correct any harm resulting from a violation or practice, including restitution, reimbursement, indemnifications or guarantees against loss. A financial institution may also be ordered to restrict its growth, dispose of certain assets, rescind agreements or contracts, or take other actions as determined by the ordering agency to be appropriate.

 

Anti-Money Laundering. Financial institutions must maintain anti-money laundering programs that include established internal policies, procedures, and controls; a designated compliance officer; an ongoing employee training program; and testing of the program by an independent audit function. The Company and the Bank are also prohibited from entering into specified financial transactions and account relationships and must meet enhanced standards for due diligence and “knowing your customer” in their dealings with foreign financial institutions and foreign customers. Financial institutions must take reasonable steps to conduct enhanced scrutiny of account relationships to guard against money laundering and to report any suspicious transactions, and recent laws provide law enforcement authorities with increased access to financial information maintained by banks. Anti-money laundering obligations have been substantially strengthened as a result of the USA Patriot Act, enacted in 2001 and renewed in 2006. Bank regulators routinely examine institutions for compliance with these obligations and are required to consider compliance in connection with the regulatory review of applications. The regulatory authorities have been active in imposing “cease and desist” orders and money penalty sanctions against institutions found to be violating these obligations.

 

USA PATRIOT Act. The USA PATRIOT Act became effective on October 26, 2001, and provides, in part, for the facilitation of information sharing among governmental entities and financial institutions for the purpose of combating terrorism and money laundering by enhancing anti-money laundering and financial transparency laws, as well as enhanced information collection tools and enforcement mechanics for the U.S. government, including: (i) standards for verifying customer identification at account opening; (ii) rules to promote cooperation among financial institutions, regulators, and law enforcement entities in identifying parties that may be involved in terrorism or money laundering; (iii) reports by nonfinancial trades and businesses filed with the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network for transactions exceeding $10,000; and (iv) suspicious activities reports by brokers and dealers if they believe a customer may be violating U.S. laws and regulations and enhanced due diligence requirements for financial institutions that administer, maintain, or manage private bank accounts or correspondent accounts for non-U.S. persons. Bank regulators routinely examine institutions for compliance with these obligations and are required to consider compliance in connection with the regulatory review of applications.

 

26
 

Under the USA PATRIOT Act, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (“FBI”) can send our banking regulatory agencies lists of the names of persons suspected of involvement in terrorist activities. The Bank can be requested to search its records for any relationships or transactions with persons on those lists. If the Bank finds any relationships or transactions, it must file a suspicious activity report and contact the FBI.

 

The Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”), which is a division of the Treasury, is responsible for helping to insure that United States entities do not engage in transactions with “enemies” of the United States, as defined by various Executive Orders and Acts of Congress. OFAC has sent, and will send, our banking regulatory agencies lists of names of persons and organizations suspected of aiding, harboring or engaging in terrorist acts. If the Bank finds a name on any transaction, account or wire transfer that is on an OFAC list, it must freeze such account, file a suspicious activity report and notify the FBI. The Bank has appointed an OFAC compliance officer to oversee the inspection of its accounts and the filing of any notifications. The Bank actively checks high-risk OFAC areas such as new accounts, wire transfers and customer files. The Bank performs these checks utilizing software, which is updated each time a modification is made to the lists provided by OFAC and other agencies of Specially Designated Nationals and Blocked Persons.

 

Privacy and Credit Reporting. Financial institutions are required to disclose their policies for collecting and protecting confidential information. Customers generally may prevent financial institutions from sharing nonpublic personal financial information with nonaffiliated third parties except under narrow circumstances, such as the processing of transactions requested by the consumer or when the financial institution is jointly sponsoring a product or service with a nonaffiliated third party. Additionally, financial institutions generally may not disclose consumer account numbers to any nonaffiliated third party for use in telemarketing, direct mail marketing or other marketing to consumers. It is the Bank’s policy not to disclose any personal information unless required by law.

 

Like other lending institutions, the Bank utilizes credit bureau data in its underwriting activities. Use of such data is regulated under the Federal Credit Reporting Act on a uniform, nationwide basis, including credit reporting, prescreening, sharing of information between affiliates, and the use of credit data. The Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 (the “FACT Act”) authorizes states to enact identity theft laws that are not inconsistent with the conduct required by the provisions of the FACT Act.

 

Payment of Dividends. A South Carolina state bank may not pay dividends from its capital. All dividends must be paid out of undivided profits then on hand, after deducting expenses, including reserves for losses and bad debts. In addition, under the FDICIA, the Bank may not pay a dividend if, after paying the dividend, the Bank would be undercapitalized. As described above, on February 10, 2011, the Bank entered into a Consent Order with the FDIC and the State Board which, among other things, prohibits the Bank from declaring or paying any dividends on its shares of common stock without the prior approval of the supervisory authorities.

 

Effect of Governmental Monetary Policies. Our earnings are affected by domestic economic conditions and the monetary and fiscal policies of the United States government and its agencies. The Federal Reserve Bank’s monetary policies have had, and are likely to continue to have, an important impact on the operating results of commercial banks through its power to implement national monetary policy in order, among other things, to curb inflation or combat a recession. The monetary policies of the Federal Reserve Board have major effects upon the levels of bank loans, investments and deposits through its open market operations in United States government securities and through its regulation of the discount rate on borrowings of member banks and the reserve requirements against member bank deposits. It is not possible to predict the nature or impact of future changes in monetary and fiscal policies.

 

27
 

Insurance of Accounts and Regulation by the FDIC.   The Bank’s deposits are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the FDIC. As insurer, the FDIC imposes deposit insurance premiums and is authorized to conduct examinations of and to require reporting by FDIC insured institutions. It also may prohibit any FDIC insured institution from engaging in any activity the FDIC determines by regulation or order to pose a serious risk to the insurance fund. The FDIC also has the authority to initiate enforcement actions against savings institutions, after giving a bank’s regulatory authority an opportunity to take such action, and may terminate the deposit insurance if it determines that the institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices or is in an unsafe or unsound condition.

 

FDIC insured institutions are required to pay a Financing Corporation assessment to fund the interest on bonds issued to resolve thrift failures in the 1980s. The Financing Corporation quarterly assessment for the fourth quarter of 2012 equaled 1.75 basis points for each $100 of average consolidated total assets minus average tangible equity. These assessments, which may be revised based upon the level of deposits, will continue until the bonds mature in the years 2017 through 2019.

 

The FDIC may terminate the deposit insurance of any insured depository institution, including the Bank, if it determines after a hearing that the institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices, is in an unsafe or unsound condition to continue operations or has violated any applicable law, regulation, rule, order or condition imposed by the FDIC. It also may suspend deposit insurance temporarily during the hearing process for the permanent termination of insurance, if the institution has no tangible capital. If insurance of accounts is terminated, the accounts at the institution at the time of the termination, less subsequent withdrawals, shall continue to be insured for a period of six months to two years, as determined by the FDIC. Management is not aware of any practice, condition or violation that might lead to termination of the Bank’s deposit insurance.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

Our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be harmed by any of the following risks, or other risks that have not been identified or which we believe are immaterial or unlikely. Shareholders should carefully consider the risks described below in conjunction with the other information in this Form 10-K and the information incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements and related notes.

 

Risks Relating to Becoming Current in Our Periodic Reporting with the SEC

 

Our efforts to become current in our periodic reporting obligations have required diversion of management’s attention from business operations, led to concerns on the part of customers, creditors, investors and employees about our financial condition and resulted in the incurrence of additional expenses.

 

During the fiscal years covered by this Annual Report, our management, including our finance and accounting staff, have devoted and continue to devote substantial time, effort and resources to efforts to become current in our periodic reporting obligations or maintain compliance with these requirements, in addition to performing their day-to-day duties. These efforts have diverted, and may continue to divert, managements’ attention away from our business. In addition, the delay in the completion of our periodic reports has caused concerns on the part of customers, creditors, investors and employees. In addition, we have increased our professional expenses to assist in the preparation of financial statements and periodic reports to become current in our SEC filings.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

There are serious concerns about whether we have enough capital to support future operations.

 

We have prepared the consolidated financial statements contained in this Report assuming that the Company will be able to continue as a going concern, which contemplates the realization of assets and the discharge of liabilities in the normal course of business for the foreseeable future. However, as a result of recurring losses, as well as uncertainties associated with the Bank’s ability to increase its capital levels to meet regulatory requirements, management has serious concerns about our future operations and ability to maintain certain regulatory capital levels which will be required for us to continue our banking operations. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be necessary if we are unable to maintain regulatory capital at certain levels. If we are unable to reach certain regulatory capital levels, our shareholders will likely lose all of their investment in the Company.

 

28
 

We have an immediate need to raise capital, and we will need additional capital in the future, but capital may not be available to us as needed or on favorable terms.

 

We are required by federal and state regulatory authorities to maintain adequate levels of capital to support our operations.  Pursuant to the Consent Order, the Bank was required to achieve Tier 1 capital at least equal to 8% of total assets and Total Risk-Based capital at least equal to 10% of total risk-weighted assets by July 10, 2011. As of December 31, 2012, the Bank is not in compliance with the minimum capital requirements established in the Consent Order and is designated as “critically undercapitalized.” As a result, we have an immediate need to raise capital. The Bank is working diligently to increase its capital ratios in order to strengthen its balance sheet and satisfy the commitments required under the Consent Order. The Bank has engaged independent third parties to assist the Bank in its efforts to increase its capital ratios. Our ability to raise additional capital will depend in part on conditions in the capital markets at that time, which are outside our control, and on our financial performance. In addition, we may find it particularly difficult given the amount of our outstanding senior equity and debt securities, including the Series T Preferred Stock, the trust preferred securities, and our 2010 subordinated promissory notes. Accordingly, additional capital may not be raised, if and when needed, on terms acceptable to us, or at all. If we issue additional equity capital, it may be at a lower price and in all cases our existing shareholders’ interest would be diluted. If we cannot raise additional capital to meet the minimum capital requirements set forth under the Consent Order, or if we suffer a continued deterioration in our financial condition, we may be placed into a federal conservatorship or receivership by the FDIC. If this were to occur, then you would lose your investment in the Company.

 

We are subject to a Consent Order that requires us to take certain actions, and if we do not comply with the Consent Order, or if our condition continues to deteriorate, our Bank may be placed in a federal conservatorship or receivership by the FDIC.

 

On February 10, 2011, the Bank entered into a Consent Order with the FDIC and the State Board, which contains, among other things, a requirement that our Bank achieve and maintain minimum capital requirements that exceed the minimum regulatory capital ratios for “well-capitalized” banks.  Under this enforcement action, the Bank may no longer accept, renew, or roll over brokered deposits.  In addition, under the Consent Order, we are required to obtain FDIC approval before making certain payments to departing executives and before adding new directors or senior executives.  Our regulators have considerable discretion in whether to grant required approvals, and no assurance can be given that such approvals would be forthcoming.  In addition, we are required to take certain other actions in the areas of capital, liquidity, asset quality, and interest rate risk management, as well as to file periodic reports with the FDIC and the State Board regarding our progress in complying with the Consent Order. 

 

The Bank failed to meet the minimum capital requirements by the July 9, 2011 deadline set forth in the Consent Order and, as a result, the Bank submitted a revised Capital Restoration Plan to the FDIC on September 30, 2011 detailing the steps the Bank plans to take to achieve these minimum capital requirements. The Bank is not currently in compliance with the minimum capital requirements and, as of December 31, 2012, the Bank is categorized as “critically undercapitalized.” As a result, a number of requirements or restrictions can or will be imposed on the Company and the Bank in addition to those set forth under the Consent Order and the Written Agreement. These additional requirements and restrictions: (i) prohibit the Bank from paying any bonus to a senior executive officer or providing compensation to a senior executive officer at a rate exceeding the officer’s average rate of compensation (excluding bonuses, stock options and profit-sharing) during the 12 months preceding the month in which the Bank became undercapitalized, without prior written approval from the FDIC; (ii) require the FDIC to impose one or more of the following on the Bank: (A) require a sale of Bank shares or obligations of the Bank sufficient to return the Bank to adequately capitalized status; (B) if grounds exist for the appointment of a receiver or conservator for the Bank, require the Bank to be acquired or merged with another institution; (C) impose additional restrictions on transactions with affiliates beyond the normal restrictions applicable to all banks; (D) impose more stringent growth restrictions on the Bank, or require the Bank to further reduce its total assets; (E) require the Bank to alter, reduce or terminate any activities the FDIC determines pose excessive risk to the Bank; (F) order a new election of Bank directors; (G) require the Bank to dismiss any senior executive officer or director who held office for more than 180 days before the Bank became undercapitalized; (H) require the Bank to employ “qualified” senior executive officers; (I) require the Company to divest the Bank if the regulators determine that the divestiture would improve the Bank’s financial condition and future prospects; and (J) require the Bank to take any other action that the FDIC determines will better carry out the purposes of the statute requiring the imposition of one or more of the restrictions described in (A)-(I) above; and (iii) require prior regulatory approval for material transactions outside the usual course of business, extending credit for a highly leveraged transactions, amending the Bank’s Articles of Incorporation or bylaws, making a material change to accounting methods, paying excessive compensation or bonuses, and paying interest on new or renewed liabilities at a rate that would increase the Bank’s weighted average cost of funds to a level significantly exceeding the prevailing rates on interest on deposits in the Bank’s normal market areas.

 

29
 

As a “critically undercapitalized,” institution the FDIC can place the Bank into conservatorship or receivership within 90 days of the Bank becoming critically undercapitalized, unless the FDIC determines that “other action” would better achieve the purposes of the FDIC’s prompt corrective action capital requirements. If the Bank were to be taken into receivership, then you would lose your investment in the Company. See the prior section entitled “Our Strategic Plan” for information on the actions the Bank is currently taking and plans to take to meet the minimum capital requirements set forth by the Consent Order.

 

If we do not generate positive cash flow and earnings, there will be an adverse effect on our future results of operations.

 

For the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, we incurred a net loss of $9.5 million and $29.0 million, respectively. In light of the current economic environment, significant additional provisions for loan losses may be necessary to supplement the allowance for loan losses in the future. As a result, we may incur significant additional credit costs in the future, which could adversely impact our financial condition, results of operations, and the value of our common stock.

 

If our nonperforming assets increase, our earnings will be adversely affected.

 

At December 31, 2012, our nonperforming assets (which consist of nonaccruing loans, loans 90 days or more past due, restructured troubled loans and other real estate owned) totaled $72.2 million, or 15.39% of total assets. At December 31, 2011, our nonperforming assets were $86.9 million, or 16.22% of total assets. Our nonperforming assets adversely affect our net income in various ways:

·We typically do not record interest income on nonaccrual loans or real estate owned. Management may elect to continue the accrual of interest on loans when the estimated net realizable value of collateral exceeds the principal balance and accrued interest.
·We must provide for probable loan losses through a current period charge to the provision for loan losses.
·Noninterest expense increases when we must write down the value of properties in our other real estate owned portfolio to reflect changing market values.
·There are legal fees associated with the resolution of problem assets, as well as carrying costs, such as taxes, insurance, and maintenance fees related to other real estate owned.
·The resolution of nonperforming assets requires the active involvement of management, which can distract them from more profitable activity.

 

If additional borrowers become delinquent and do not pay their loans and we are unable to successfully manage our nonperforming assets, our losses and troubled assets could increase significantly, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

30
 

We have sustained losses from a decline in credit quality and may see further losses.

 

Our ability to generate earnings is significantly affected by our ability to properly originate, underwrite and service loans. We have sustained losses primarily because borrowers, guarantors or related parties have failed to perform in accordance with the terms of their loans and we failed to detect or respond to deterioration in asset quality in a timely manner. We could sustain additional losses for these reasons. Further problems with credit quality or asset quality could cause our interest income and net interest margin to further decrease, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. We have recently identified credit deficiencies with respect to certain loans in our loan portfolio which are primarily related to the downturn in the residential housing industry. As a result of the decline of the residential housing market, property values for this type of collateral have declined substantially. Although we believe credit quality indicators are showing signs of stabilization, further deterioration in the coastal South Carolina real estate market as a whole may cause management to adjust its opinion of the level of credit quality in our loan portfolio. Such a determination may lead to an additional increase in our provisions for loan losses, which could also adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

Difficult market conditions in our coastal markets and economic trends have adversely affected our industry and our business and may continue to do so.

 

Our business has been directly affected by market conditions, trends in industry and finance, legislative and regulatory changes, and changes in governmental monetary and fiscal policies and inflation, all of which are beyond our control.  The current economic downturn, increase in unemployment and other events that have negatively affected both household and corporate incomes, both nationally and locally, have decreased the demand for loans and our other products and services and have increased the number of customers who fail to pay interest and/or principal on their loans.  As a result, we have experienced significant declines in our coastal real estate markets with decreasing prices and increasing delinquencies and foreclosures, which have negatively affected the credit performance of our loans and resulted in increases in the level of our nonperforming assets and charge-offs of problem loans.  At the same time, competition among depository institutions for quality loans has increased significantly.  Bank and bank holding company stock prices have been negatively affected, as has the ability of banks and bank holding companies to raise capital or borrow in the debt markets compared to recent years.  These market conditions and the tightening of credit have led to increased deficiencies in our loan portfolio, increased market volatility and widespread reduction in general business activity.

 

Our future success significantly depends upon the growth in population, income levels, deposits and housing starts in our market areas.  Unlike many larger institutions, we are not able to spread the risks of unfavorable economic conditions across a large number of diversified economies and geographic locations.  If the markets in which we operate do not recover and grow as anticipated or if prevailing economic conditions locally or nationally do not improve, our business may continue to be negatively impacted.

 

A significant portion of our loan portfolio is secured by real estate, and events that negatively impact the real estate market could hurt our business.

 

A significant portion of our loan portfolio is secured by real estate.  As of December 31, 2012, approximately 83.7% of our loans had real estate as a primary or secondary component of collateral.  The real estate collateral in each case provides an alternate source of repayment in the event of default by the borrower and may deteriorate in value during the time the credit is extended.  The recent weakening of the real estate market in our market areas, and particularly in our Myrtle Beach market area, could result in an increase in the number of borrowers who default on their loans and a reduction in the value of the collateral securing their loans, which in turn could have an adverse effect on our profitability and asset quality.  If we are required to liquidate the collateral securing a loan to satisfy the debt during a period of reduced real estate values, our earnings and capital could be adversely affected.  Acts of nature, including hurricanes, tornados, earthquakes, fires and floods, each of which may be exacerbated by global climate change and may cause uninsured damage and other loss of value to real estate that secures these loans, may also negatively impact our financial condition.

 

31
 

We have a concentration of credit exposure in commercial real estate and challenges faced by the commercial real estate market could adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

As of December 31, 2012, we had approximately $161.3 million in loans outstanding to borrowers whereby the collateral securing the loan was commercial real estate, representing approximately 53.4% of our total loans outstanding as of that date. Approximately 25.3% of this real estate are owner-occupied properties. Commercial real estate loans are generally viewed as having more risk of default than residential real estate loans. They are also typically larger than residential real estate loans and consumer loans and depend on cash flows from the owner’s business or the property to service the debt. Cash flows may be affected significantly by general economic conditions, and a downturn in the local economy or in occupancy rates in the local economy where the property is located could increase the likelihood of default. Because our loan portfolio contains a number of commercial real estate loans with relatively large balances, the deterioration of one or a few of these loans could cause a significant increase in our level of non-performing loans. An increase in non-performing loans could result in a loss of earnings from these loans, an increase in the related provision for loan losses and an increase in charge-offs, all of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

The banking regulators are giving commercial real estate lending greater scrutiny, and may require banks with higher levels of commercial real estate loans to implement more stringent underwriting, internal controls, risk management policies and portfolio stress testing, as well as possibly higher levels of allowances for losses and capital levels as a result of commercial real estate lending growth and exposures.

 

If our allowance for loan losses is not sufficient to cover actual loan losses, or if credit delinquencies increase, our losses could increase.

 

Our success depends, to a significant extent, on the quality of our assets, particularly loans.  Like other financial institutions, we face the risk that our customers will not repay their loans, that the collateral securing the payment of those loans may be insufficient to assure repayment, and that we may be unsuccessful in recovering the remaining loan balances.  The risk of loss varies with, among other things, general economic conditions, the type of loan, the creditworthiness of the borrower over the term of the loan and, for many of our loans, the value of the real estate and other assets serving as collateral.  Management makes various assumptions and judgments about the collectibility of our loan portfolio after considering these and other factors.  Based in part on those assumptions and judgments, we maintain an allowance for loan losses in an attempt to cover any loan losses that may occur.  In determining the size of the allowance, we also rely on an analysis of our loan portfolio based on historical loss experience, volume and types of loans, trends in classification, delinquencies and nonaccruals, national and local economic conditions and other pertinent information, including the results of external loan reviews.  Despite our efforts, our loan assessment techniques may fail to properly account for potential loan losses, and, as a result, our established loan loss reserves may prove insufficient.  If we are unable to generate income to compensate for these losses, they could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.

 

In addition, federal and state regulators periodically review our allowance for loan losses and may require us to increase our allowance for loan losses or recognize further loan charge-offs, based on judgments different than those of our management.  Higher charge-off rates and an increase in our allowance for loan losses may hurt our overall financial performance and may increase our cost of funds.  As of December 31, 2012, we had 66 loans on nonaccrual status totaling approximately $ 22.6 million, and our allowance for loan losses was $14.2 million. For the year ended December 31, 2012, we recorded a provision for loan losses of $10.5 million as compared to a $25.3 million provision for loan losses for the year ended December 31, 2011. Our current and future allowances for loan losses may not be adequate to cover future loan losses given current and future market conditions.

 

A percentage of the loans in our portfolio currently include exceptions to our loan policies and supervisory guidelines.

 

All of the loans that we make are subject to written loan policies adopted by our board of directors and to supervisory guidelines imposed by our regulators.  Our loan policies are designed to reduce the risks associated with the loans that we make by requiring our loan officers to take certain steps that vary depending on the type and amount of the loan, prior to closing a loan.  These steps include, among other things, making sure the proper liens are documented and perfected on property securing a loan, and requiring proof of adequate insurance coverage on property securing loans.  Loans that do not fully comply with our loan policies are known as “exceptions.”  We categorize exceptions as policy exceptions, financial statement exceptions and collateral exceptions.  As a result of these exceptions, such loans may have a higher risk of loan loss than the other loans in our portfolio that fully comply with our loan policies.  In addition, we may be subject to regulatory action by federal or state banking authorities if they believe the number of exceptions in our loan portfolio represents an unsafe banking practice.  Although we have taken steps to enhance the quality of our loan portfolio, we may not be successful in reducing the number of exceptions.

 

32
 

Liquidity risks could affect operations and jeopardize our financial condition.

 

The goal of liquidity management is to ensure that we can meet customer loan requests, customer deposit maturities and withdrawals, and other cash commitments under both normal operating conditions and under unpredictable circumstances of industry or market stress.  To achieve this goal, our asset/liability committee establishes liquidity guidelines that require sufficient asset-based liquidity to cover potential funding requirements and to avoid over-dependence on volatile, less reliable funding sources.

 

Liquidity is essential to our business.  An inability to raise funds through traditional deposits, borrowings, the sale of securities or loans, issuance of additional equity securities, and other sources could have a substantial negative impact on our liquidity.  Our access to funding sources in amounts adequate to finance our activities and with terms acceptable to us could be impaired by factors that impact us specifically or the financial services industry in general.  Factors that could detrimentally impact access to liquidity sources include a decrease in the level of our business activity as a result of a downturn in the markets in which our loans are concentrated, the change in our status from well-capitalized to undercapitalized, or regulatory action against us.  Our ability to borrow could also be impaired by factors that are not specific to us, such as the current disruption in the financial markets and negative views and expectations about the prospects for the financial services industry as a result of the continuing turmoil and deterioration in the credit markets.

 

Traditionally, the primary sources of funds of our Bank have been customer deposits and loan repayments.  As of December 31, 2012, we had brokered deposits of $43.1 million, representing 9.9% of our total deposits, all of which will mature by 2015.  Because of the Consent Order, we may not accept brokered deposits unless a waiver is granted by the FDIC.  We may need to find other sources of liquidity to replace these deposits as they mature.  Secondary sources of liquidity may include proceeds from Federal Home Loan Bank (the “FHLB”) advances, federal funds lines of credit from correspondent banks and QwickRate CDs obtained via the Internet. The Bank’s credit risk rating at the FHLB has been negatively impacted, resulting in more restrictive borrowing requirements. Because we are critically undercapitalized, we are required to pledge additional collateral for FHLB advances.

 

We actively monitor the depository institutions that hold our federal funds sold and due from banks cash balances.   We cannot provide assurances that access to our cash and cash equivalents and federal funds sold will not be impacted by adverse conditions in the financial markets.  Our emphasis is primarily on safety of principal, and we diversify cash, due from banks, and federal funds sold among counterparties to minimize exposure relating to any one of these entities.  We routinely review the financials of our counterparties as part of our risk management process.  Balances in our accounts with financial institutions in the U.S. may exceed the FDIC insurance limits.  While we monitor and adjust the balances in our accounts as appropriate, these balances could be impacted if the correspondent financial institutions fail.

 

There can be no assurance that our sources of funds will be adequate for our liquidity needs, and we may be compelled to seek additional sources of financing in the future.  Specifically, we may seek additional debt in the future to achieve our business objectives.  There can be no assurance that additional borrowings, if sought, would be available to us or, if available, would be on favorable terms. Bank and holding company stock prices have been negatively impacted by the recent adverse economic conditions, as has the ability of banks and holding companies to raise capital or borrow in the debt markets.  If additional financing sources are unavailable or not available on reasonable terms, our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows, and future prospects could be materially adversely impacted.

 

33
 

Higher FDIC deposit insurance premiums and assessments could adversely impact our financial condition.

Our deposits are insured up to applicable limits by the Deposit Insurance Fund of the FDIC and are subject to deposit insurance assessments to maintain deposit insurance. As an FDIC-insured institution, we are required to pay quarterly deposit insurance premium assessments to the FDIC. Although we cannot predict what the insurance assessment rates will be in the future, either a deterioration in our risk-based capital ratios or adjustments to the base assessment rates could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.  

We are dependent on key individuals and the loss of one or more of these key individuals could curtail our growth and adversely affect our prospects.

 

James R. Clarkson, our president and chief executive officer, has extensive and long-standing ties within our primary market area and he has contributed significantly to our growth. If we lose the services of Mr. Clarkson, he would be difficult to replace, and our business and development could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our success also depends, in part, on our continued ability to attract and retain experienced loan originators, as well as other management personnel. The loss of the services of several of such key personnel could adversely affect our growth strategy and prospects to the extent we are unable to replace such personnel.

 

We are subject to extensive regulation that could restrict our activities and impose financial requirements or limitations on the conduct of our business and limit our ability to receive dividends from our Bank.

 

We are subject to Federal Reserve regulation. Our Bank is subject to extensive regulation, supervision, and examination by our primary federal regulator, the FDIC, the regulating authority that insures customer deposits. Also, as a member of the FHLB, our Bank must comply with applicable regulations of the Federal Housing Finance Board and the FHLB. Regulation by these agencies is intended primarily for the protection of our depositors and the deposit insurance fund and not for the benefit of our shareholders. Our Bank’s activities are also regulated under consumer protection laws applicable to our lending, deposit, and other activities. A sufficient claim against our bank under these laws could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act may have a material adverse effect on our operations.

 

The Dodd-Frank Act imposes significant regulatory and compliance changes on our business, including:

 

·changes to regulatory capital requirements;
·exclusion of hybrid securities, including trust preferred securities, issued on or after May 19, 2010 from Tier 1 capital;
·creation of new government regulatory agencies (such as the Financial Stability Oversight Council, which oversees systemic risk, and the CFPB, which develops and enforces rules for bank and non-bank providers of consumer financial products);
·potential limitations on federal preemption;
·changes to deposit insurance assessments;
·regulation of debit interchange fees we earn;
·changes in retail banking regulations, including potential limitations on certain fees we may charge; and
·changes in regulation of consumer mortgage loan origination and risk retention.

 

In addition, the Dodd-Frank Act restricts the ability of banks to engage in certain proprietary trading or to sponsor or invest in private equity or hedge funds. The Dodd-Frank Act also contains provisions designed to limit the ability of insured depository institutions, their holding companies and their affiliates to conduct certain swaps and derivatives activities and to take certain principal positions in financial instruments.

 

34
 

Some provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act became effective immediately upon its enactment. Many provisions, however, will require regulations to be promulgated by various federal agencies in order to be implemented, some but not all of which have been proposed or finalized by the applicable federal agencies. The provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act may have unintended effects, which will not be clear until after implementation. Certain changes resulting from the Dodd-Frank Act may impact the profitability of our business activities, require changes to certain of our business practices, impose upon us more stringent capital, liquidity and leverage requirements or otherwise adversely affect our business. These changes may also require us to invest significant management attention and resources to evaluate and make any changes necessary to comply with new statutory and regulatory requirements. Failure to comply with the new requirements may negatively impact our results of operations and financial condition. While we cannot predict what effect any presently contemplated or future changes in the laws or regulations or their interpretations would have on us, these changes could be materially adverse to investors in our common stock.

 

New capital rules that were recently issued generally require insured depository institutions and certain holding companies to hold more capital. The impact of the new rules on our financial condition and operations is uncertain but could be materially adverse.

 

On July 2, 2013, the Federal Reserve adopted a final rule for the Basel III capital framework and, on July 9, 2013, the OCC also adopted a final rule and the FDIC adopted the same provisions in the form of an “interim final rule.” The rule will apply to all national and state banks, such as the Bank, and savings associations and most bank holding companies and savings and loan holding companies, which we collectively refer to herein as “covered” banking organizations. Bank holding companies with less than $500 million in total consolidated assets, such as the Company, are not subject to the final rule, nor are savings and loan holding companies substantially engaged in commercial activities or insurance underwriting. The requirements in the rule begin to phase in on January 1, 2015 for covered banking organizations such as the Bank. The requirements in the rule will be fully phased in by January 1, 2019.

 

The final rules increase capital requirements and generally include two new capital measurements that will affect the Bank, a risk-based common equity Tier 1 ratio and a capital conservation buffer. Common Equity Tier 1 (“CET1”) capital is a subset of Tier 1 capital and is limited to common equity (plus related surplus), retained earnings, accumulated other comprehensive income and certain other items. Other instruments that have historically qualified for Tier 1 treatment, including non-cumulative perpetual preferred stock, are consigned to a category known as Additional Tier 1 capital and must be phased out over a period of nine years beginning in 2014. The rules permit bank holding companies with less than $15 billion in assets to continue to include trust preferred securities and non-cumulative perpetual preferred stock issued before May 19, 2010 in Tier 1 capital, but not CET1. Tier 2 capital consists of instruments that have historically been placed in Tier 2, as well as cumulative perpetual preferred stock.

 

Beginning in 2015, the minimum capital requirements for the Bank will be (i) a CET1 ratio of 4.5%, (ii) a Tier 1 capital (CET1 plus Additional Tier 1 capital) of 6% (up from 4%) and (iii) a total capital ratio of 8% (the current requirement). Our leverage ratio requirement will remain at the 4% level now required. Beginning in 2016, a capital conservation buffer will phase in over three years, ultimately resulting in a requirement of 2.5% on top of the CET1, Tier 1 and total capital requirements, resulting in a required CET1 ratio of 7%, a Tier 1 ratio of 8.5%, and a total capital ratio of 10.5%. Failure to satisfy any of these three capital requirements will result in limits on paying dividends, engaging in share repurchases and paying discretionary bonuses. These limitations will establish a maximum percentage of eligible retained income that could be utilized for such actions. While the final rules will result in higher regulatory capital standards, it is difficult at this time to predict when or how any new standards will ultimately be applied to us.

 

In addition to the higher required capital ratios and the new deductions and adjustments, the final rules increase the risk weights for certain assets, meaning that we will have to hold more capital against these assets. For example, commercial real estate loans that do not meet certain new underwriting requirements must be risk-weighted at 150%, rather than the current 100%. There are also new risk weights for unsettled transactions and derivatives. We also will be required to hold capital against short-term commitments that are not unconditionally cancelable; currently, there are no capital requirements for these off-balance sheet assets. All changes to the risk weights take effect in full in 2015.

 

35
 

In addition, in the current economic and regulatory environment, bank regulators may impose capital requirements that are more stringent than those required by applicable existing regulations. The application of more stringent capital requirements for us could, among other things, result in lower returns on equity, require the raising of additional capital, and result in regulatory actions if we were to be unable to comply with such requirements. Implementation of changes to asset risk weightings for risk-based capital calculations, items included or deducted in calculating regulatory capital or additional capital conservation buffers, could result in management modifying our business strategy and could limit our ability to make distributions, including paying dividends or buying back our shares.

 

We face a risk of noncompliance and enforcement action with the BSA and other anti-money laundering statutes and regulations.

 

The BSA, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (which we refer to as the “Patriot Act”) and other laws and regulations require financial institutions, among other duties, to institute and maintain effective anti-money laundering programs and file suspicious activity and currency transaction reports as appropriate. The federal Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, established by the U.S. Treasury to administer the BSA, is authorized to impose significant civil money penalties for violations of those requirements and has recently engaged in coordinated enforcement efforts with the individual federal banking regulators, as well as the U.S. Department of Justice, Drug Enforcement Administration and Internal Revenue Service. There is also increased scrutiny of compliance with the rules enforced by the OFAC. Federal and state bank regulators also have begun to focus on compliance with BSA and anti-money laundering regulations. If our policies, procedures and systems are deemed deficient or the policies, procedures and systems of the financial institutions that we have already acquired or may acquire in the future are deficient, we would be subject to liability, including fines and regulatory actions such as restrictions on our ability to pay dividends and the necessity to obtain regulatory approvals to proceed with certain aspects of our business plan, including our acquisition plans, which would negatively impact our business, financial condition and results of operations. Failure to maintain and implement adequate programs to combat money laundering and terrorist financing could also have serious reputational consequences for us.

 

Federal, state and local consumer lending laws may restrict our ability to originate certain mortgage loans or increase our risk of liability with respect to such loans and could increase our cost of doing business.

 

Federal, state and local laws have been adopted that are intended to eliminate certain lending practices considered “predatory.” These laws prohibit practices such as steering borrowers away from more affordable products, selling unnecessary insurance to borrowers, repeatedly refinancing loans and making loans without a reasonable expectation that the borrowers will be able to repay the loans irrespective of the value of the underlying property. Over the course of 2013, the CFPB has issued several rules on mortgage lending, notably a rule requiring all home mortgage lenders to determine a borrower’s ability to repay the loan. Loans with certain terms and conditions and that otherwise meet the definition of a “qualified mortgage” may be protected from liability to a borrower for failing to make the necessary determinations. In either case, we may find it necessary to tighten our mortgage loan underwriting standards in response to the CFPB rules, which may constrain our ability to make loans consistent with our business strategies. It is our policy not to make predatory loans and to determine borrowers’ ability to repay, but the law and related rules create the potential for increased liability with respect to our lending and loan investment activities. They increase our cost of doing business and, ultimately, may prevent us from making certain loans and cause us to reduce the average percentage rate or the points and fees on loans that we do make.

 

36
 

We are subject to federal and state fair lending laws, and failure to comply with these laws could lead to material penalties.

 

Federal and state fair lending laws and regulations, such as the Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act, impose nondiscriminatory lending requirements on financial institutions. The Department of Justice, CFPB and other federal and state agencies are responsible for enforcing these laws and regulations. Private parties may also have the ability to challenge an institution’s performance under fair lending laws in private class action litigation. A successful challenge to our performance under the fair lending laws and regulations could adversely impact our rating under the CRA and result in a wide variety of sanctions, including the required payment of damages and civil money penalties, injunctive relief, imposition of restrictions on merger and acquisition activity and restrictions on expansion activity, which could negatively impact our reputation, business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Failure to comply with government regulation and supervision could result in sanctions by regulatory agencies, civil money penalties, and damage to our reputation.

 

Our operations are subject to extensive regulation by federal, state, and local governmental authorities. Given the current disruption in the financial markets, we expect that the government will continue to pass new regulations and laws that will impact us. Compliance with such regulations may increase our costs and limit our ability to pursue business opportunities. Failure to comply with laws, regulations, and policies could result in sanctions by regulatory agencies, civil money penalties, and damage to our reputation. While we have policies and procedures in place that are designed to prevent violations of these laws, regulations, and policies, there can be no assurance that such violations will not occur.

 

 We may be adversely affected by the soundness of other financial institutions.

 

Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, counterparty, or other relationships. We have exposure to many different industries and counterparties, and routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, including commercial banks, brokers and dealers, investment banks, and other institutional clients. Many of these transactions expose us to credit risk in the event of a default by a counterparty or client. In addition, our credit risk may be exacerbated when the collateral held by the Bank cannot be realized upon or is liquidated at prices not sufficient to recover the full amount of the credit or derivative exposure due to the Bank. Any such losses could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

We could experience a loss due to competition with other financial institutions.

The banking and financial services industry is very competitive. Legal and regulatory developments have made it easier for new and sometimes unregulated competitors to compete with us. The financial services industry has and is experiencing an ongoing trend towards consolidation in which fewer large national and regional banks and other financial institutions are replacing many smaller and more local banks. These larger banks and other financial institutions hold a large accumulation of assets and have significantly greater resources and a wider geographic presence or greater accessibility. In some instances, these larger entities operate without the traditional brick and mortar facilities that restrict geographic presence. Some competitors are able to offer more services, more favorable pricing or greater customer convenience than the Company. In addition, competition has increased from new banks and other financial services providers that target our existing or potential customers. As consolidation continues among large banks, we expect other smaller institutions to try to compete in the markets we serve.

Technological developments have allowed competitors, including some non-depository institutions, to compete more effectively in local markets and have expanded the range of financial products, services and capital available to our target customers. If we are unable to implement, maintain and use such technologies effectively, we may not be able to offer products or achieve cost-efficiencies necessary to compete in the industry. In addition, some of these competitors have fewer regulatory constraints and lower cost structures.

37
 

A failure in or breach of our operational or security systems or infrastructure, or those of our third party vendors and other service providers or other third parties, including as a result of cyber attacks, could disrupt our businesses, result in the disclosure or misuse of confidential or proprietary information, damage our reputation, increase our costs, and cause losses.

We rely heavily on communications and information systems to conduct our business. Information security risks for financial institutions such as ours have generally increased in recent years in part because of the proliferation of new technologies, the use of the internet and telecommunications technologies to conduct financial transactions, and the increased sophistication and activities of organized crime, hackers, and terrorists, activists, and other external parties. As customer, public, and regulatory expectations regarding operational and information security have increased, our operating systems and infrastructure must continue to be safeguarded and monitored for potential failures, disruptions, and breakdowns. Our business, financial, accounting, and data processing systems, or other operating systems and facilities may stop operating properly or become disabled or damaged as a result of a number of factors, including events that are wholly or partially beyond our control. For example, there could be electrical or telecommunication outages; natural disasters such as earthquakes, tornadoes, and hurricanes; disease pandemics; events arising from local or larger scale political or social matters, including terrorist acts; and as described below, cyber attacks.

As noted above, our business relies on our digital technologies, computer and email systems, software and networks to conduct its operations. Although we have information security procedures and controls in place, our technologies, systems, networks, and our customers’ devices may become the target of cyber attacks or information security breaches that could result in the unauthorized release, gathering, monitoring, misuse, loss, or destruction of our or our customers’ or other third parties’ confidential information. Third parties with whom we do business or that facilitate our business activities, including financial intermediaries, or vendors that provide service or security solutions for our operations, and other unaffiliated third parties, including the South Carolina Department of Revenue, which had customer records exposed in a 2012 cyber attack, could also be sources of operational and information security risk to us, including from breakdowns or failures of their own systems or capacity constraints.

While we have disaster recovery and other policies and procedures designed to prevent or limit the effect of the failure, interruption or security breach of our information systems, there can be no assurance that any such failures, interruptions or security breaches will not occur or, if they do occur, that they will be adequately addressed. Our risk and exposure to these matters remains heightened because of the evolving nature of these threats. As a result, cyber security and the continued development and enhancement of our controls, processes, and practices designed to protect our systems, computers, software, data, and networks from attack, damage or unauthorized access remain a focus for us. As threats continue to evolve, we may be required to expend additional resources to continue to modify or enhance our protective measures or to investigate and remediate information security vulnerabilities. Disruptions or failures in the physical infrastructure or operating systems that support our businesses and clients, or cyber attacks or security breaches of the networks, systems or devices that our clients use to access our products and services could result in client attrition, regulatory fines, penalties or intervention, reputation damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, and/or additional compliance costs, any of which could have a material effect on our results of operations or financial condition.

Negative public opinion surrounding our Company and the financial institutions industry generally could damage our reputation and adversely impact our earnings.

Reputation risk, or the risk to our business, earnings and capital from negative public opinion surrounding our Company and the financial institutions industry generally, is inherent in our business. Negative public opinion can result from our actual or alleged conduct in any number of activities, including lending practices, corporate governance and acquisitions, and from actions taken by government regulators and community organizations in response to those activities. Negative public opinion can adversely affect our ability to keep and attract clients and employees and can expose us to litigation and regulatory action. Although we take steps to minimize reputation risk in dealing with our clients and communities, this risk will always be present given the nature of our business.

38
 

The downgrade of the U.S. credit rating could negatively impact our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Recent U.S. debt ceiling and budget deficit concerns together with signs of deteriorating sovereign debt conditions in Europe, have increased the possibility of additional credit-rating downgrades and economic slowdowns in the U.S. Although U.S. lawmakers passed legislation to raise the federal debt ceiling in 2011, Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services lowered its long-term sovereign credit rating on the U.S. from “AAA” to “AA+” in August 2011. The impact of any further downgrades to the U.S. government’s sovereign credit rating or its perceived creditworthiness could adversely affect the U.S. and global financial markets and economic conditions. In January 2013, the U.S. government adopted legislation to suspend the debt limit until May 19, 2013. In October 2013, the debt ceiling was suspended until February 7, 2014. Moody’s and Fitch have each warned that they may downgrade the U.S. government’s rating if the federal debt is not stabilized. A downgrade of the U.S. government’s credit rating or a default by the U.S. government to satisfy its debt obligations likely would create broader financial turmoil and uncertainty, which would weigh heavily on the global banking system. It is possible that any such impact could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

Because of our participation in the U.S. Treasury’s Capital Purchase Program, we are subject to several restrictions including restrictions on compensation paid to our executives.

 

On March 6, 2009, as part of the Capital Purchase Program established by the U.S. Treasury under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, we entered into a Letter of Agreement with Treasury pursuant to which we issued and sold to Treasury (i) 12,895 shares of our Fixed Rate Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series T, having a liquidation preference of $1,000 per share (the “Series T Preferred Stock”), and (ii) a ten-year warrant to purchase up to 91,714 shares of our common stock at an initial exercise price of $21.09 per share, for an aggregate purchase price of $12,895,000 in cash. Pursuant to the terms of the Letter Agreement, we adopted certain standards for executive compensation and corporate governance for the period during which Treasury holds the equity issued pursuant to the Letter Agreement, including the common stock which may be issued pursuant to the warrant.  These standards generally apply to our named executive officers. The standards include (i) ensuring that incentive compensation for senior executives does not encourage unnecessary and excessive risks that threaten the value of the financial institution; (ii) required clawback of any bonus or incentive compensation paid to a senior executive based on statements of earnings, gains or other criteria that are later proven to be materially inaccurate; (iii) prohibition on making golden parachute payments to senior executives; (iv) prohibition on providing tax gross-up provisions; and (v) agreement not to deduct for tax purposes executive compensation in excess of $500,000 for each senior executive.  In particular, the change to the deductibility limit on executive compensation may likely increase the overall cost of our compensation programs in future periods and may make it more difficult to attract suitable candidates to serve as executive officers.

 

The Series T Preferred Stock impacts net income available to our common shareholders and earnings per common share, and the warrant we issued to Treasury may be dilutive to holders of our common stock.

 

The dividends declared on the Series T Preferred Stock issued to Treasury through the Capital Purchase Program will reduce the net income available to common shareholders and our earnings per common share. Notably, because we did not redeem the Series T Preferred Stock prior to March 6, 2014, the cost of this capital increased on that date from 5.0% per annum (approximately $644,750 annually) to 9.0% per annum (approximately $1,160,550 annually). Also, we have been forced to defer and accrue nine quarterly dividend payments to Treasury and, thus, are prohibited from paying dividends on our common stock until all accrued dividends on the Series T Preferred Stock are paid in full. The Series T Preferred Stock will also receive preferential treatment in the event of liquidation, dissolution or winding up of the Company. 

 

Additionally, the ownership interest of the existing holders of our common stock will be diluted to the extent the warrant we issued to Treasury in conjunction with the sale to Treasury of the Series T Preferred Stock is exercised.  The 91,714 shares of common stock underlying the warrant represent approximately 2.5% of the shares of our common stock outstanding as of December 31, 2012 (including the shares issuable upon exercise of the warrant in total shares outstanding).  Although Treasury has agreed not to vote any of the shares of common stock it receives upon exercise of the warrant, a transferee of any portion of the warrant or of any shares of common stock acquired upon exercise of the warrant is not bound by this restriction.  We note, however, that the exercise price on Treasury’s warrant is $21.09 and the Company’s current trading price was approximately $0.07 at December 31, 2012.

 

39
 

Given the geographic concentration of our operations, we could be significantly affected by any hurricane that affects coastal South Carolina.

Our loan portfolio consists of loans to persons and businesses located in coastal South Carolina. The collateral for many of our loans consists of real and personal property located in this area, which is susceptible to hurricanes that can cause extensive damage to the general region. Disaster conditions resulting from any hurricane that hits in this area would adversely affect the local economies and real estate markets, which could negatively impact our business. Adverse economic conditions resulting from such a disaster could also negatively affect the ability of our customers to repay their loans and could reduce the value of the collateral securing these loans. Furthermore, damage resulting from any hurricane could also result in continued economic uncertainty that could negatively impact businesses in those areas. Consequently, our ability to continue to originate loans may be impaired by adverse changes in local and regional economic conditions in this area following any hurricane.

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

 

There is no active public trading market for our common stock, and one is not expected to develop.

 

Our common stock is not listed for trading on any securities exchange, and we presently do not intend to apply to list our common stock on any national securities exchange at any time in the foreseeable future. Consequently, the liquidity of our common stock, and our investors’ ability to sell shares of our common stock, will depend upon the interest of the Company, existing shareholders and other potential purchasers. As a result of this limited market, it may be difficult to identify buyers to whom our investors can sell their shares of our common stock, and our investors may be unable to sell their shares at an established market price, at a price that is favorable to the investors, or at all. This limited market will restrict our investors’ ability to sell shares of our common stock at a desirable or stable price, or at all, at any one time. Our investors should be prepared to own our common stock indefinitely.

 

We are currently prohibited from paying cash dividends, and we may be unable to pay future dividends even if we desire to do so.

 

Our ability to pay cash dividends is limited by our Bank’s ability to pay cash dividends to our Company and by our need to maintain sufficient capital to support our operations. The ability of our Bank to pay cash dividends to our Company is currently prohibited by the restrictions of the Consent Order. Further, the Bank currently has negative retained earnings due to losses incurred over the past four years and therefore would be unable to pay cash dividends, regardless of the restrictions imposed by the Consent Order. In addition, our Company also has negative retained earnings and is prohibited from paying dividends without the prior approval of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. Consequently, we do not anticipate paying cash dividends on shares of our common stock in the foreseeable future.

 

Shares of our preferred stock may be issued in the future which could materially adversely affect the rights of the holders of our common stock.

 

Pursuant to our Articles of Incorporation, we have the authority to issue additional series of preferred stock and to determine the designations, preferences, rights and qualifications or restrictions of those shares without any further vote or action of the shareholders. The rights of the holders of our common stock will be subject to, and may be materially adversely affected by, the rights of the holders of any preferred stock that may be issued by us in the future.

 

40
 

Shares of our common stock are not insured bank deposits and are subject to market risk.

 

Our shares of common stock are not deposits, savings accounts or other obligations of us, our Bank or any other depository institution; are not guaranteed by us or any other entity; and are not insured by the FDIC or any other governmental agency.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

 

None.

 

Item 2. Description of Property.

 

The main office of the Bank is located at 5009 Broad Street, Loris, South Carolina, 29569. Our operational support services and executive offices are located in our Operations Center at 3640 Ralph Ellis Boulevard, Loris, South Carolina, 29569. Our operational support services include central deposit and central credit operations, computer operations, audit and compliance operations, human resources, training, marketing and credit administration operations. Currently, we have for sale or lease our former Operations Center at 5201 Broad Street, Loris, South Carolina, 29569 as well as our former Homewood branch at 3201 Highway 701 North, Conway, South Carolina, 29526.

 

The Bank presently owns 11 lots on which we have branch banking facilities and our current Operations Center in addition to the previously mentioned available for sale lots. In addition, the Bank has entered into one long-term lease agreement for a lot on which we have built a branch banking facility at 3210 Highway 701 Bypass, Loris, South Carolina, 29569.

 

During September, 2011, we closed our Covenant Towers branch in an effort to decrease our expenses. Also in January 2012, the Company closed its branches in the Homewood community and on Meeting Street in Loris to decrease its number of branches from 13 to 11. The Company closed these offices in order to reduce expenses without materially reducing the Company’s deposits and loans.

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

 

In the ordinary course of operations, we may be a party to various legal proceedings from time to time. As of December 31, 2012 and the date of this Report, except as noted below we do not believe that there is any pending or threatened proceeding against us, which, if determined adversely, would have a material effect on our business, results of operations, or financial condition.

 

·On April 26, 2012, Samuel C. Thomas, Jr. and Pamela A. Thomas filed a lawsuit in the Court of Common Pleas for the Fifteenth Judicial District, State of South Carolina, County of Horry, Case No. 2012-CP-26-3295. The Complaint names the Company and the Bank and current and former members of the Bank’s and/or Company’s Board of Directors as defendants. The Complaint alleges that the Plaintiffs were misled into investing $2 million in the Company’s subordinated promissory notes offering in the second and third quarters of 2010. The Complaint alleges that the Bank promised to loan the Plaintiffs up to 90% of the amount that the Plaintiffs would invest in the subordinated notes offering in the event that Plaintiffs needed access to these funds prior to the maturity of the subordinated notes, and, once the Plaintiffs applied for the loan, the Bank denied the loan request. The Complaint seeks actual damages, consequential damages, punitive damages as allowed by law, pre-judgment and post-judgment interest as allowed by law, penalties as mandated by statute, set-off against other obligations of the Plaintiffs due to the Company and the Bank, attorney’s fees and costs. All Defendants moved to stay the litigation and compel arbitration and the Court granted the motion.

 

·On July 19, 2012, Robert Shelley, in his individual capacity and on behalf of a proposed class of other similarly situated persons, filed a lawsuit in the Court of Common Pleas for the Fifteenth Judicial Circuit, State of South Carolina, County of Horry, Case No. 2012-CP-26-5546. The Complaint named the Company and the Bank as Defendants. However, the Complaint was never served on the Company or Bank. On September 27, 2012, Plaintiff filed an Amended Complaint. The Amended Complaint alleges that Plaintiff and other similarly situated persons were contacted by employees of the Bank, who then solicited a sale of Bank stock. The Amended Complaint further alleges that Bank employees did not disclose material information about the Bank’s financial condition to the Plaintiff and others prior to their respective purchases of stock. The Amended Complaint seeks the certification of a class action to include all those purchasers of Bank stock who were solicited to purchase such stock between July 1, 2009 and December 31, 2011. Plaintiff has asserted causes of action for violation of the South Carolina Uniform Securities Act, negligence and civil conspiracy, and seeks actual, punitive and treble damages and attorneys’ fees and costs. The Company and the Bank made a motion for summary judgment in March 2014, and the court granted the motion for summary judgment on April 8, 2014. Robert Shelley has 30 days to file and appeal from April 9, 2014. If he does not, the summary judgment order will become final and the matter will be dismissed with prejudice.

 

41
 
·On or about October 4, 2012, the United States Attorney for the District of South Carolina served the Company and Bank with a subpoena requesting the production of documents related to the Company’s offering and sale of subordinated debt notes. The subpoena number is GJ #2/2012-0215 and the Company and Bank are working closely with the appropriate contacts to provide them with the requested documents.

 

·On or about November 7, 2012, the South Carolina Attorney General served the Company and Bank with a subpoena requesting the production of documents related to: (1) names of certain officers, directors, shareholders, employees, and agents, as well as meetings of the Board of Directors or shareholders of the Company and/or the Bank; (2) the Company’s offering and sale of subordinated debt notes; and (3) the offering and/or sale of Company stock and related filings. The South Carolina Attorney General’s file number is 12063 and the Company and Bank are working closely with the appropriate contacts to provide them with the requested documents. The Company believes that the proceedings will not have any material adverse effect on the financial condition or operations of the Company.

 

·Plaintiff Jan W. Snyder purchased $25,000 in subordinated debt notes in or around March 2010.  After making three semi-annual interest payments, the Company was precluded from making further payments by the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.  On January 14, 2014 Mr. Snyder sued the Company, the Bank, and several current and former officers, directors and employees in the Court of Common Pleas for the Fifteenth Judicial District, State of South Carolina, County of Horry, Case No. 2014-CP-26-0204. He is alleging that he and a similarly situated class of subordinated debt purchasers have suffered an unspecified amount of damages resulting from the Defendants’ wrongful conduct leading up to their respective purchases of subordinated debt notes. There are several causes of action alleged, including fraud, violation of state securities statutes, negligence and others.  Mr. Snyder has brought this case on his behalf and as a representative of a class of similarly situated purchasers of subordinated debt notes.  The Company and the Bank have engaged legal counsel and intend to vigorously defend against this lawsuit.

 

·Plaintiff Mozingo + Wallace Architects, LLC, was a depositor with the Bank.  An employee named Debor Guear was charged with being responsible for the Mozingo + Wallace Architects, LLC’s finances, including the receipt and review of account statements, payment of invoices, and reconciling all financial accounts.  In 2013, another bank advised Mozingo + Wallace Architects, LLC that it had been receiving an unusually high number of checks issued by Mozingo + Wallace Architects, LLC to Ms. Guear’s account.  Mozingo + Wallace Architects, LLC obtained records of its account at the Bank and alleges that Ms. Guear had been making unauthorized transactions from its account to herself, her husband, and her husband’s business.  On September 25, 2013, Mozingo + Wallace Architects, LLC sued the Bank in the Court of Common Pleas for the Fifteenth Judicial District, State of South Carolina, County of Horry, Case No. 2013-CP-26-6494, alleging that it improperly allowed Ms. Guear to control and access account statements so that Mozingo + Wallace Architects, LLC could not discover the unauthorized transactions and seeking damages in an unspecified amount.  The Bank has engaged legal counsel and intends to vigorously defend against this lawsuit.

 

·On or about January 10, 2013 and January 9, 2014, the SEC served the Company and Bank with subpoenas requesting the production of documents related to the Company’s offering and sale of subordinated debt notes. The case/investigation number is A-3459.  The Company and Bank provided timely responses to both subpoenas and continues to work closely with the SEC to provide them with any further documents they may need.

 

42
 

The Company has engaged legal counsel for the litigation and intends to vigorously defend itself. The ultimate outcome of the litigation and subpoena production is unknown at this time. However, given the Company’s current troubled financial condition, any expenses incurred by the Company for defense costs, governmental sanctions, or settlement or other litigation awards could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

 

Not applicable.

 

43
 

PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

 

As of December 31, 2012, there were 3,738,337 shares of our common stock outstanding held by approximately 2,400 shareholders of record. There is currently no established public trading market in our common stock and trading and quotations of our common stock have been limited and sporadic. Most of the trades of which the Company is aware have been privately negotiated by local buyers and sellers. In addition to these trades, the Company is aware of a number of quotations on the OTC Bulletin Board between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012 that ranged from $0.07 to $0.85. The following table which sets forth the high and low closing prices for our common stock of which we are aware for the periods indicated. Private trading of our common stock has been limited but has been conducted through the Private Trading System, which was implemented on our website (www.hcsbaccess.com) on April 1, 2010 and is operated by the Bank. The Private Trading System is a passive mechanism created to assist buyers and sellers in facilitating trades in our common stock. Because there has not been an established market for our common stock, we may not be aware of all prices at which our common stock has been traded. We have not determined whether the trades of which we are aware were the result of arm’s-length negotiations between the parties. Based on information available to us, we believe transactions in our common stock can be fairly summarized as follows for the periods indicated:

 

   2012     Low  High
Fourth Quarter  $0.07   $0.48 
Third Quarter  $0.25   $0.85 
Second Quarter  $0.20   $0.25 
First Quarter  $0.20   $0.51 
           
   2011             
Fourth Quarter  $0.20   $0.75 
Third Quarter  $0.65   $2.50 
Second Quarter  $1.01   $1.30 
First Quarter  $1.10   $8.98 

 

Under the terms of the Written Agreement, the Company is currently prohibited from declaring or paying any dividends without the prior written approval of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. In addition, because the Company is a legal entity separate and distinct from the Bank and has little direct income itself, the Company relies on dividends paid to it by the Bank in order to pay dividends on its common stock. As a South Carolina state bank, the Bank may only pay dividends out of its net profits, after deducting expenses, including losses and bad debts. Under the FDICIA, the Bank may not pay a dividend if, after paying the dividend, the Bank would be undercapitalized. As of December 31, 2012, the Bank was classified as “critically undercapitalized,” and therefore it is prohibited under FDICIA from paying dividends until it increases its capital levels. In addition, even if it increases its capital levels, under the terms of the Consent Order, the Bank is prohibited from declaring a dividend on its shares of common stock unless it receives approval from the FDIC and State Board. Further, as a result of the Company’s deferral of dividend payments on the 12,895 shares of preferred stock issued to the U.S. Treasury in March 2009 pursuant to the CPP and interest payments on the $6.0 million of trust preferred securities issued in December 2004, the Company is prohibited from paying any dividends on its common stock until all deferred payments have been made in full.

 

As a result of these restrictions on the Company, including the restrictions on the Bank’s ability to pay dividends to the Company, the Company does not anticipate paying dividends for the foreseeable future, and all future dividends will be dependent on the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows, as well as capital regulations and dividend restrictions from the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, the FDIC, and the State Board.

44
 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

 

The following table sets forth certain selected financial data concerning the Company. The selected financial data has been derived from the financial statements. This information should be read in conjunction with the financial statements of the Company, including the accompanying notes, included elsewhere herein.

 

Year Ended December 31,  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008
(Dollars in thousands, except per share)               
                
Financial Condition:                         
Investment securities, available for sale  $77,320   $100,207   $265,190   $169,463   $166,992 
Allowance for loan losses   14,150    21,178    14,489    7,525    4,416 
Net loans   288,084    345,817    431,185    485,796    424,692 
Premises and equipment, net   21,694    22,514    23,389    24,152    19,056 
Total assets   468,996    535,698    787,441    760,359    644,347 
Noninterest-bearing deposits   33,103    37,029    38,255    31,661    31,285 
Interest-bearing deposits   402,758    453,824    590,706    546,631    453,466 
Total deposits   435,861    490,853    628,961    578,292    484,751 
Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank   22,000    22,000    104,200    118,800    92,000 
Total liabilities   480,758    540,914    760,942    715,287    609,897 
Total shareholders’ equity (deficit)   (11,762)   (5,216)   26,499    45,072    34,450 
                          
Results of Operations:                         
Interest income  $20,371   $25,654   $32,550   $34,101   $31,139 
Interest expense   6,261    8,924    14,567    15,593    14,537 
Net interest income   14,110    16,730    17,983    18,508    16,602 
Provision for loan losses   10,530    25,271    23,084    10,361    1,754 
Net interest income (loss) after provision for loan losses   3,580    (8,541)   (5,101)   8,147    14,848 
Other income   4,574    6,217    4,090    7,605    3,586 
Other expense   17,681    21,695    20,641    17,940    15,086 
Income (loss) before income taxes   (9,527)   (24,019)   (21,652)   (2,188)   3,348 
Income tax expense (benefit)   —      4,998    (4,383)   (840)   1,104 
Net income (loss)  $(9,527)  $(29,017)  $(17,269)  $(1,348)  $2,244 
                          
Per Share Data (1):                         
Net income (loss) – basic  $(2.78)  $(7.98)  $(4.78)  $(0.44)  $0.59 
Period end book value  $(6.51)  $(4.70)  $3.79   $8.74   $9.09 

 

(1)Adjustments were made for the 3% stock dividend declared in January 2009.

 

 

45
 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

 

INTRODUCTION

 

The following discussion describes our results of operations for 2012 as compared to 2011 and also analyzes our financial condition as of December 31, 2012 as compared to December 31, 2011. Like most community banks, we derive most of our income from interest we receive on our loans and investments. Our primary source of funds for making these loans and investments is our deposits, both interest-bearing and noninterest-bearing. Consequently, one of the key measures of our success is our amount of net interest income, or the difference between the income on our interest-earning assets, such as loans and investments, and the expense on our interest-bearing liabilities, such as deposits and borrowed funds. In order to maximize our net interest income, we must not only manage the volume of these balance sheet items, but also the yields that we earn on our interest-earning assets and the rates that we pay on interest-bearing liabilities.

 

We have included a number of tables to assist in our description of these measures. For example, the “Average Balances” table shows the average balance during 2012, 2011, and 2010 of each category of our assets and liabilities, as well as the yield we earned or the rate we paid with respect to each category. A review of this table shows that our loans typically provide higher interest yields than do other types of interest earning assets, which is why we direct a substantial percentage of our earning assets into our loan portfolio. Similarly, the “Rate/Volume Analysis” table helps demonstrate the impact of changing interest rates and changing volume of assets and liabilities during the years shown. We also track the sensitivity of our various categories of assets and liabilities to changes in interest rates, and we have included an “Interest Rate Sensitivity Analysis” table to help explain this. Finally, we have included a number of tables that provide details about our investment securities, our loans, and our deposits and other borrowings.

 

There are risks inherent in all loans so we maintain an allowance for loan losses to absorb probable losses on existing loans that may become uncollectible. We establish and maintain this allowance by charging a provision for loan losses against our operating earnings. In the “Loan Portfolio” section we have included a detailed discussion of this process, as well as several tables describing our allowance for loan losses and the allocation of this allowance among our various categories of loans.

 

In addition to earning interest on our loans and investments, we earn income through fees that we charge to our customers. Likewise, we incur other operating expenses as well. We describe the various components of this noninterest income, as well as our noninterest expense, in the following discussion.

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The Company experienced a decrease of $5.3 million, or 20.59%, in total interest income for the year ended December 31, 2012 compared to the year ended December 31, 2011. The Company experienced a decrease in interest, including fees, on our loan portfolio of $3.6 million, or 17.39%, to $17.3 million during 2012 from $20.9 million during 2011, which was the result of decreased loan volume during 2012. The Company also experienced a decrease in the interest income on taxable securities, which decreased $1.3 million or 31.65%, due to a decrease in our securities available-for-sale of $22.9 million during 2012. Because of the decline in total deposits of $55.0 million during 2012 and declines in rates, total interest expense decreased $2.7 million, or 29.84%, to $6.3 million. The overall impact resulted in a $2.6 million, or 15.66%, decrease in net interest income in 2012. Noninterest income decreased $1.6 million or 26.42% in 2012 compared to 2011, primarily due to higher realization of gains on sales of available-for-sale securities in 2011. Noninterest expenses decreased $4.0 million, or 18.50%. Prepayment penalties on FHLB advances recognized in 2011 did not recur in 2012. Management also focused on reducing all noninterest expenses throughout 2012. Overall, the Company incurred a net loss for the year ended December 31, 2012 of $9.5 million, compared to a net loss of $29.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. The net loss for 2012 was primarily driven by the provision for loan losses of $10.5 million.

 

46
 

ASSETS, LIABILITIES, AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

During the twelve months ended December 31, 2012, total assets decreased $66.7 million, or 12.45%, when compared to December 31, 2011. Management continued to reduce assets in an effort to preserve capital ratios. Loans decreased $64.8 million and investment securities available-for-sale decreased $22.9 million during 2012. Total deposits decreased $55.0 million, or 11.20%, from the December 31, 2011 amount of $490.9 million. Interest-bearing deposits decreased $51.1 million, and noninterest-bearing deposits decreased $3.9 million during 2012.

 

DISTRIBUTION OF ASSETS, LIABILITIES, AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

The Company has sought to maintain a conservative approach in determining the distribution of its assets and liabilities. The following table presents the percentage relationships of significant components of the Company’s average balance sheets for the last three fiscal years.

 

Balance Sheet Categories as a Percent of Average Total Assets

 

Year ended December 31, (in thousands)  2012  2011  2010
          
Assets:               
  Interest earning assets:               
    Interest-bearing deposits in other banks   6.67%   3.44%   3.49%
    Investment securities   20.20    23.98    28.42 
    Loans   64.74    65.42    60.85 
            Total interest earning assets   91.61    92.84    92.76 
  Cash and due from banks   1.23    0.74    0.97 
  Allowance for loan losses   (3.75)   (2.77)   (1.30)
  Premises and equipment   4.10    3.67    3.00 
  Other assets   6.81    5.52    4.57 
            Total assets   100.00%   100.00%   100.00%
                
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity:               
  Interest-bearing liabilities:               
    Interest-bearing deposits   84.29%   78.95%   72.77%
    Federal funds purchased   0.00    0.01    0.01 
    Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank   4.22    7.91    13.92 
    Repurchase agreements   1.20    1.37    0.94 
    Subordinate debentures   2.31    1.92    0.98 
    Debt due to trust   1.19    0.99    0.78 
            Total interest-bearing liabilities   93.21    91.15    89.40 
  Noninterest-bearing deposits   7.04    6.56    4.98 
  Accrued interest and other liabilities   0.73    0.46    0.44 
            Total liabilities   100.98    98.17    94.82 
  Shareholders’ equity (deficit)   (0.98)   1.83    5.18 
            Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity (deficit)   100.00%   100.00%   100.00%

 

 

47
 

NET INTEREST INCOME

 

Earnings are dependent to a large degree on net interest income. Net interest income represents the difference between gross interest earned on earning assets, primarily loans and investment securities, and interest paid on deposits and borrowed funds. Net interest income is affected by the interest rates earned or paid and by volume changes in loans, investment securities, deposits, and borrowed funds. The interest rate spread and the net yield on earning assets are two significant elements in analyzing the Company’s net interest income. The interest rate spread is the difference between the yield on average earning assets and the rate on average interest-bearing liabilities. The net yield on earning assets is computed by dividing net interest income by average earning assets.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2012, net interest income was $14.1 million, a decrease of $2.6 million, or 15.66%, from net interest income of $16.7 million in 2011. The decline in our net interest income was the result of the decrease in our interest income on loans, including fees, of $3.6 million, or 17.39%, from $20.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 to $17.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. This decrease was attributable to the decrease in the average volume of our loan portfolio from $410.0 million as of December 31, 2011 to $337.4 million as of December 31, 2012 with only a slight decrease in yield. Interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2012 was $6.3 million, compared to $8.9 million for 2011. This represents a decrease of $2.6 million, or 29.84%, compared to the prior year, and was primarily the result of the decrease in average interest-bearing deposits of $55.6 million, borrowings in the amount of $30.0 million, and reduced interest rates paid on deposits. The net yield realized on earning assets was 2.96% for 2012, compared to 2.88% in 2011. The interest rate spread was 2.98% and 2.85% in 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the weighted-average yields earned, the weighted-average yields paid, the interest rate spread, and the net yield on earning assets. The table also indicates the average daily balance and the interest income or expense by specific categories.

 

Average Balances, Income and Expenses, and Rates

Years ended December 31,

(in thousands)  2012  2011  2010
   Interest  Interest  Interest
   Average  Income/  Yield/  Average  Income/  Yield/  Average  Income/  Yield/
ASSETS  Balance  Expense  Cost  Balance  Expense  Cost  Balance  Expense  Cost
  Loans (1)  $337,445   $17,301    5.13%  $410,043   $20,943    5.11%  $483,570   $26,151    5.41%
  Securities, taxable   94,901    2,818    2.97%   127,087    4,123    3.24%   210,778    5,978    2.84%
  Securities, nontaxable   7,735    115    1.49%   17,546    472    2.69%   8,502    315    3.71%
Nonmarketable equity securities   2,616    47    1.80%   5,685    53    0.93%   6,519    25    0.38%
  Interest-bearing deposits   34,779    90    0.26%   21,532    63    0.29%   27,747    81    0.29%
    Total earning assets   477,476    20,371    4.27%   581,893    25,654    4.41%   737,116    32,550    4.42%
  Cash and due from banks   6,433              4,643              7,728           
  Allowance for loan losses   (19,561)             (17,363)             (10,309)          
  Premises and equipment   21,369              23,023              23,836           
  Other assets   35,488              34,609              36,316           
    Total assets  $521,205             $626,805             $794,687           
                                              
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY                                             
                                              
Deposits  $439,317    3,961    0.90%  $494,898    6,011    1.21%  $578,260    10,044    1.73%
Borrowings   46,475    2,300    4.95%   76,433    2,913    3.81%   132,173    4,523    3.42%
Total interest-bearing liabilities   485,792    6,261    1.29%   571,331    8,924    1.56%   710,433    14,567    2.05%
Non-interest  deposits   36,681              41,121              39,546           
Other liabilities   3,825              2,878              3,519           
Stockholders’ equity (deficit)   (5,093)             11,475              41,189           
Total liabilities and equity (deficit)  $521,205             $626,805             $794,687           
                                              
Net interest income/interest rate spread       $14,110    2.98%       $16,730    2.85%       $17,983    2.37%
Net yield on earning assets             2.96%             2.88%             2.44%

 

(1)Average loan balances include nonaccrual loans.

48
 

RATE/VOLUME ANALYSIS

 

Net interest income can also be analyzed in terms of the impact of changing rates and changing volume. The following table describes the extent to which changes in interest rates and changes in the volume of earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities have affected the Company’s interest income and interest expense during the periods indicated. Information on changes in each category attributable to volume (change in volume multiplied by prior period rate) and to rates (changes in rates multiplied by prior period volume) is provided as follows:

 

   2012 Compared to 2011  2011 Compared to 2010
      Increase (Decrease)     Increase (Decrease)
      Due To(1)     Due To(1)
December 31, (in thousands)  Total  Rate  Volume  Total  Rate  Volume
                   
Interest-earning assets:                              
  Interest-bearing deposits  $27   $(6)  $33   $(18)  $—     $(18)
  Securities, taxable   (1,305)   (327)   (978)   (1,855)   1,054    (2,909)
  Securities, nontaxable   (357)   (159)   (198)   157    (54)   211 
  Nonmarketable equity securities   (6)   (15)   9    28    31    (3)
  Loans   (3,642)   80    (3,722)   (5,208)   (1,394)   (3,814)
          Total   (5,283)   (427)   (4,856)   (6,896)   (363)   (6,533)
                               
Interest-bearing liabilities:                              
  Deposits   (2,050)   (1,428)   (622)   (4,033)   (2,726)   (1,307)
  Borrowings   (613)   1,959    (2,572)   (1,610)   594    (2,204)
          Total   (2,663)   531    (3,194)   (5,643)   (2,132)   (3,511)
          Net interest income  $(2,620)  $(958)  $(1,662)  $(1,253)  $1,769   $(3,022)

 

(1) Volume-rate changes have been allocated to each category based on a consistent basis between rate and volume.

 

RATE SENSITIVITY

 

Interest rates paid on deposits and borrowed funds and interest rates earned on loans and investments have generally followed the fluctuations in market rates in 2012 and 2011. However, fluctuations in market interest rates do not necessarily have a significant impact on net interest income, depending on the Company’s interest rate sensitivity position. A rate-sensitive asset or liability is one that can be repriced either up or down in interest rate within a certain time interval. When a proper balance exists between rate-sensitive assets and rate-sensitive liabilities, market interest rate fluctuations should not have a significant impact on liquidity and earnings. The larger the imbalance, the greater the interest rate risk assumed and the greater the positive or negative impact of interest fluctuations on liquidity and earnings.

 

Interest rate sensitivity management is concerned with the management of both the timing and the magnitude of repricing characteristics of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities and is an important part of asset/liability management. The objectives of interest rate sensitivity management are to ensure the adequacy of net interest income and to control the risks to net interest income associated with movements in interest rates. The following table, “Interest Rate Sensitivity Analysis,” indicates that, on a cumulative basis, after three through twelve months, rate-sensitive liabilities exceeded rate-sensitive assets, resulting in a twelve-month liability sensitive position. For a bank with a liability-sensitive position, or negative gap, falling interest rates would generally be expected to have a positive effect on net interest income, and rising interest rates would generally be expected to have the opposite effect.

 

49
 

RATE SENSITIVITY – continued

 

The following table presents the Company’s rate sensitivity at each of the time intervals indicated as of December 31, 2012 and may not be indicative of the Company’s rate-sensitivity position at other points in time:

 

Interest Rate Sensitivity Analysis

 

December 31, 2012  Within One  After One Through Three  After Three Through Twelve  Within One  Greater Than One Year or   
(Dollars in thousands)  Month  Months  Months  Year  Non-Sensitive  Total
Assets                              
Interest-earning assets                              
  Loans  $99,063   $32,495   $80,987   $212,545   $89,689   $302,234 
  Securities(1)   22,325    11,445    16,510    50,280    26,870    77,150 
      Total earning assets  $121,388   $43,940   $97,497   $262,825   $116,559   $379,384 
                               
Liabilities                              
Interest-bearing liabilities:                              
  Interest-bearing deposits:                              
    Demand deposits   —      —      —      —      43,053    43,053 
    Money market and savings deposits   92,676    —      —      92,676    —      92,676 
    Time deposits   19,945    35,373    111,907    167,225    99,804    267,029 
      Total interest-bearing deposits   112,621    35,373    111,907    259,901    142,857    402,758 
Other borrowings   1,303    —      —      1,303    22,000    23,303 
Subordinated debentures   —      —      —      —      12,062    12,062 
Junior subordinated debentures   —      6,186    —      6,186    —      6,186 
      Total interest-bearing liabilities  $113,924   $41,559   $111,907   $267,390   $176,919   $444,309 
Period gap  $7,464   $2,381   $(14,410)  $(4,565)  $(60,360)     
Cumulative gap  $7,464   $9,845   $(4,565)  $(4,565)  $(64,925)     
Ratio of cumulative gap to total earning assets   1.97%   2.59%   (1.20)%   (1.20)%   (17.11)%     

 

(1) Securities are presented at amortized cost basis

 

PROVISION FOR LOAN LOSSES

 

The provision for loan losses is charged to earnings based upon management’s evaluation of specific loans in its portfolio and general economic conditions and trends in the marketplace. The 2012 and 2011 provisions for loan losses and their related effect of increasing the allowance for loan losses are related to growth in the delinquencies within the loan portfolio. Please refer to the section “Loan Portfolio” for a discussion of management’s evaluation of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses. In 2012 and 2011, the provisions for loan losses were $10.5 million and $25.3 million, respectively.

 

NONINTEREST INCOME

 

Noninterest income was $4.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, a decrease of $1.6 million, or 26.42%, when compared with the year ended December 31, 2011. The decrease is largely a result of gains on sales of securities recognized in 2011 of $3.0 million compared to $1.6 million recognized in 2012.

 

 

50
 

NONINTEREST EXPENSES

 

Noninterest expenses decreased during 2012 by $4.0 million, or 18.50%, to $17.7 million. The Bank incurred penalties associated with the prepayment of a significant portion of our FHLB advances of $2.6 million in 2011 which did not recur in 2012. Salaries and employee benefits decreased $766 thousand, or 11.17%, from $6.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 to $6.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2012, which is the result of a reduction in personnel to help reduce expenses. FDIC insurance premiums decreased from $2.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2011 to $1.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2012 as the Bank’s assessment base decreased. In addition, marketing expenses decreased $128 thousand or 85.33%, to $22 thousand for the period ended December 31, 2012 from $150 thousand for the comparable period in 2011 due to management’s decision to reduce expenses in this area.

 

INCOME TAXES

 

The Company did not recognize any income tax expense for the year ended December 31, 2012. Despite a net loss before income tax, the tax expense recognized for the year ended December 31, 2011 was a result of the Company providing for a full deferred tax valuation allowance based on our evaluation of the likelihood of our ability to utilize net operating losses in the near term. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance, if based on the weight of evidence available, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of a deferred tax asset will not be realized. Management has determined that it is more likely than not that the deferred tax asset related to continuing operations at December 31, 2012 and 2011 will not be realized, and accordingly, has established a full valuation allowance.

 

LIQUIDITY

 

Liquidity is the ability to meet current and future obligations through liquidation or maturity of existing assets or the acquisition of additional liabilities. The Company manages both assets and liabilities to achieve appropriate levels of liquidity. Cash and federal funds sold are the Company’s primary sources of asset liquidity. These funds provide a cushion against short-term fluctuations in cash flow from both deposits and loans. The investment securities portfolio is the Company’s principal source of secondary asset liquidity. However, the availability of this source of funds is influenced by market conditions. Individual and commercial deposits are the Company’s primary source of funds for credit activities. Although not historically used as principal sources of liquidity, federal funds purchased from correspondent banks and advances from the FHLB are other options available to management.

 

As of December 31, 2012, the Company had no unused lines of credit to purchase federal funds from unrelated banks. Unpledged securities available-for-sale, which totaled $46.7 million at December 31, 2012, serve as a ready source of liquidity. Management believes that the Company’s liquidity sources will enable it to successfully meet its long-term operating needs. The level of liquidity is measured by the loans-to-total borrowed funds ratio, which was at 63.31% and 68.14% at December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

The Bank’s greatest source of liquidity resides in its unpledged securities portfolio. This source of liquidity may be adversely impacted by changing market conditions, reduced access to borrowing lines, or increased collateral pledge requirements imposed by lenders. The Bank has implemented a plan to address these risks and strengthen its liquidity position. To accomplish the goals of this liquidity plan, the Bank will maintain cash liquidity at a minimum of 4% of total outstanding deposits and borrowings. In addition to cash liquidity, the Bank will also maintain a minimum of 15% off balance sheet liquidity. These objectives have been established by extensive contingency funding stress testing and analytics that indicate these target minimum levels of liquidity to be appropriate and prudent.

 

51
 

LIQUIDITY - continued

 

Comprehensive weekly and quarterly liquidity analyses serve management as vital decision-making tools by providing summaries of anticipated changes in loans, investments, core deposits, and wholesale funds. These internal funding reports provide management with the details critical to anticipate immediate and long-term cash requirements, such as expected deposit runoff and loan and securities paydowns and maturities. These liquidity analyses act as a cash forecasting tool and are subject to certain assumptions based on past market and customer trends. Through consideration of the information provided in these reports, management is better able to maximize our earning opportunities by wisely and purposefully choosing our immediate, and more critically, our long-term funding sources.

 

To better manage our liquidity position, management also stress tests our liquidity position on a semi-annual basis under two scenarios: short-term crisis and a longer-term crisis. In the short term crisis, our institution would be cut off from our normal funding along with the market in general. In this scenario, the Bank would replenish our funding through the most likely sources of funding that would exist in the order of price efficiency. In the longer term crisis, the Bank would be cut off from several of our normal sources of funding as our Bank’s financial situation deteriorated. In such a case, we may not be able to utilize our federal funds borrowing lines or renew, without FDIC approval, any brokered CDs that became due, but would be allowed to utilize our unpledged securities to raise funds in the reverse repurchase market or borrow from the FHLB. On a quarterly basis, management monitors the market value of our securities portfolio to ensure its ability to be pledged if liquidity needs should arise.

 

We believe our liquidity sources are adequate to meet our needs for at least the next 12 months. However, if we are unable to meet our liquidity needs, the Bank may be placed into a federal conservatorship or receivership by the FDIC, with the FDIC appointed conservator or receiver.

 

IMPACT OF OFF-BALANCE SHEET INSTRUMENTS

 

The Company is a party to financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk in the normal course of business to meet the financing needs of its customers. These financial instruments consist of commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit. Commitments to extend credit are legally binding agreements to lend to a customer at predetermined interest rates as long as there is no violation of any condition established in the contract. Commitments generally have fixed expiration dates or other termination clauses and may require payment of a fee. A commitment involves, to varying degrees, elements of credit and interest rate risk in excess of the amount recognized in the balance sheets. The Company’s exposure to credit loss in the event of nonperformance by the other party to the instrument is represented by the contractual notional amount of the instrument. Since certain commitments are expected to expire without being drawn upon, the total commitment amounts do not necessarily represent future cash requirements. Letters of credit are conditional commitments issued to guarantee a customer’s performance to a third party and have essentially the same credit risk as other lending facilities. Standby letters of credit often expire without being used. Management believes that through various sources of liquidity, the Company has the necessary resources to meet obligations arising from these financial instruments.

 

The Company uses the same credit underwriting procedures for commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit as for on-balance-sheet instruments. The credit worthiness of each borrower is evaluated and the amount of collateral, if deemed necessary, is based on the credit evaluation. Collateral held for commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit varies but may include accounts receivable, inventory, property, plant, equipment, and income-producing commercial properties, as well as liquid assets such as time deposit accounts, brokerage accounts, and cash value of life insurance.

 

The Company is not involved in off-balance sheet contractual relationships, other than those disclosed in this report, which it believes could result in liquidity needs or other commitments or that could significantly impact earnings.

 

52
 

IMPACT OF OFF-BALANCE SHEET INSTRUMENTS - continued

 

As of December 31, 2012, commitments to extend credit totaled $29.5 million and standby letters of credit totaled $490 thousand.

 

IMPACT OF INFLATION AND CHANGING PRICES

 

The financial statements and related financial data presented herein have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles which require the measurement of financial position and operating results in terms of historical dollars without considering changes in relative purchasing power over time due to inflation. Unlike most industrial companies, virtually all of the assets and liabilities of a financial institution are monetary in nature. As a result, interest rates generally have a more significant impact on a financial institution’s performance than does the effect of inflation.

 

While the effect of inflation on a bank is normally not as significant as its influence on those businesses that have large investments in plant and inventories, it does have an effect. Interest rates generally increase as the rate of inflation increases, but the magnitude of the change in rates may not be the same. While interest rates have traditionally moved with inflation, the effect on income is diminished because both interest earned on assets and interest paid on liabilities vary directly with each other unless the Company is in a high liability sensitive position. Also, general increases in the price of goods and services will result in increased operating expenses.

 

CAPITAL RESOURCES

 

Total shareholders’ equity decreased from a deficit of $5.2 million at December 31, 2011 to a deficit of $11.8 million at December 31, 2012. The decrease of $6.5 million is primarily attributable to the net loss during the year ended December 31, 2012 of $9.5 million offset by increases in unrealized gains on our available-for-sale securities which are included in accumulated other comprehensive income. 

 

The following table shows the return on average assets (net loss divided by average total assets), return on average equity (net loss divided by average equity), and average equity to average assets ratio for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010.

 

   2012  2011  2010
Return on average assets   (1.83)%   (4.63)%   (2.17)%
Return on average equity   n/a    (252.87)%   (41.93)%
Equity to assets ratio   (0.98)%   1.83%   5.18%

 

53
 

CAPITAL RESOURCEScontinued

 

The Company and the Bank are subject to various regulatory capital requirements administered by the federal banking agencies. Failure to meet minimum capital requirements can initiate certain mandatory and possibly additional discretionary actions by regulators that, if undertaken, could have a material effect on the Company’s financial statements. Under capital adequacy guidelines and the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action, the Company and the Bank must meet specific capital guidelines that involve quantitative measures of their assets, liabilities, and certain off-balance sheet items as calculated under regulatory accounting practices. The capital amounts and classifications are also subject to qualitative judgments by the regulators about components, risk weightings, and other factors.

 

Quantitative measures established by regulation to ensure capital adequacy require the Company and the Bank to maintain minimum ratios of Tier 1 and total capital as a percentage of assets and off-balance sheet exposures, adjusted for risk weights ranging from 0% to 100%. Tier 1 capital consists of common shareholders’ equity, excluding the unrealized gain or loss on securities available-for-sale, minus certain intangible assets. Tier 2 capital consists of the allowance for loan losses subject to certain limitations. Total capital for purposes of computing the capital ratios consists of the sum of Tier 1 and Tier 2 capital. The Company and the Bank are also required to maintain capital at a minimum level based on quarterly average assets, which is known as the leverage ratio.

 

To be considered “well-capitalized,” the Bank must maintain total risk-based capital of at least 10%, Tier 1 capital of at least 6%, and a leverage ratio of at least 5%. To be considered “adequately capitalized” under these capital guidelines, the Bank must maintain a minimum total risk-based capital of 8%, with at least 4% being Tier 1 capital.

 

In addition, the Bank must maintain a minimum Tier 1 leverage ratio of at least 4%. Further, pursuant to the terms of the Consent Order with the FDIC and the State Board, the Bank must achieve and maintain Tier 1 capital at least equal to 8% and total risk-based capital at least equal to 10%. For a more detailed description of the capital amounts required to be obtained in order for the Bank to be considered “well-capitalized,” see Note 16 to our Financial Statements included in this Annual Report.

 

If a bank is not well capitalized, it cannot accept brokered deposits without prior FDIC approval. In addition, a bank that is not well capitalized cannot offer an effective yield in excess of 75 basis points over interest paid on deposits of comparable size and maturity in such institution’s normal market area for deposits accepted from within its normal market area, or national rate paid on deposits of comparable size and maturity for deposits accepted outside the Bank’s normal market area. Moreover, the FDIC generally prohibits a depository institution from making any capital distributions (including payment of a dividend) or paying any management fee to its parent holding company if the depository institution would thereafter be categorized as undercapitalized. Undercapitalized institutions are subject to growth limitations (an undercapitalized institution may not acquire another institution, establish additional branch offices or engage in any new line of business unless determined by the appropriate federal banking agency to be consistent with an accepted capital restoration plan, or unless the FDIC determines that the proposed action will further the purpose of prompt corrective action) and are required to submit a capital restoration plan. The agencies may not accept a capital restoration plan without determining, among other things, that the plan is based on realistic assumptions and is likely to succeed in restoring the depository institution’s capital. In addition, for a capital restoration plan to be acceptable, the depository institution’s parent holding company must guarantee that the institution will comply with the capital restoration plan. The aggregate liability of the parent holding company is limited to the lesser of an amount equal to 5.0% of the depository institution’s total assets at the time it became categorized as undercapitalized or the amount that is necessary (or would have been necessary) to bring the institution into compliance with all capital standards applicable with respect to such institution as of the time it fails to comply with the plan. If a depository institution fails to submit an acceptable plan, it is categorized as significantly undercapitalized.

 

54
 

CAPITAL RESOURCEScontinued

 

Significantly undercapitalized categorized depository institutions may be subject to a number of requirements and restrictions, including orders to sell sufficient voting stock to become categorized as adequately capitalized, requirements to reduce total assets, and cessation of receipt of deposits from correspondent banks. The appropriate federal banking agency may take any action authorized for a significantly undercapitalized institution if an undercapitalized institution fails to submit an acceptable capital restoration plan or fails in any material respect to implement a plan accepted by the agency. A critically undercapitalized institution is subject to having a receiver or conservator appointed to manage its affairs and for loss of its charter to conduct banking activities.

 

An insured depository institution may not pay a management fee to a bank holding company controlling that institution or any other person having control of the institution if, after making the payment, the institution would be undercapitalized. In addition, an institution cannot make a capital distribution, such as a dividend or other distribution, that is in substance a distribution of capital to the owners of the institution if following such a distribution the institution would be undercapitalized. Thus, if payment of such a management fee or the making of such would cause a bank to become undercapitalized, it could not pay a management fee or dividend to the bank holding company.

 

The following table summarizes the capital amounts and ratios of the Company and the Bank at December 31, 2012, 2011, and 2010.

 

December 31,  2012  2011  2010
(Dollars in thousands)         
The Company         
  Tier 1 capital  $(11,932)  $3,595   $28,210 
  Tier 2 capital   —      3,595    18,465 
          Total qualifying capital  $(11,932)  $7,190   $46,675 
                
  Risk-adjusted total assets               
          (including off-balance sheet exposures)  $346,929   $406,148   $504,192 
                
          Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio   (3.44)%   0.89%   5.60%
          Total risk-based capital ratio   (3.44)%   1.77%   9.26%
          Tier 1 leverage ratio   (2.41)%   0.67%   3.50%
                
The Bank               
  Tier 1 capital  $7,720   $15,620   $39,158 
  Tier 2 capital   4,455    5,276    6,437 
          Total qualifying capital  $12,175   $20,896   $45,595 
                
Risk-adjustment total assets               
          (including off-balance sheet exposures)  $346,667   $406,201   $506,888 
                
          Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio   2.23%   3.85%   7.73%
          Total risk-based capital ratio   3.51%   5.14%   9.00%
          Tier 1 leverage ratio   1.56%   2.90%   4.85%

 

55
 

CAPITAL RESOURCEScontinued

 

At December 31, 2012, the Company and the Bank were categorized as “critically undercapitalized.” Our losses over the past few years have adversely impacted our capital. As a result, we have been pursuing a plan to increase our capital ratios in order to strengthen our balance sheet and satisfy the commitments required under the Consent Order. In addition, the Consent Order required us to achieve and maintain, by July 10, 2011, Total Risk Based capital at least equal to 10% of risk-weighted assets and Tier 1 capital at least equal to 8% of total assets. We did not meet that requirement and, as a result, submitted a revised capital restoration plan to the FDIC on July 15, 2011. The revised capital restoration plan was determined by the FDIC to be insufficient and, as a result, we submitted a further revised capital restoration plan to the FDIC on September 30, 2011. We received the FDIC’s non-objection to the further revised capital restoration plan on December 6, 2011.

 

Approximately $15.6 million in capital would have returned the Bank to “adequately capitalized” and $31.9 million in capital would have returned the Bank to “well capitalized” under regulatory guidelines on a pro forma basis as of December 31, 2012. If we continue to decrease the size of the Bank or return the Bank to profitability, then we could achieve these capital ratios with less additional capital. However, if we suffer additional loan losses or losses in our other real estate owned portfolio, then we would need additional capital to achieve these ratios. There are no assurances that we will be able to raise this capital on a timely basis or at all. If we cannot meet the minimum capital requirements set forth under the Consent Order and return the Bank to a “well capitalized” designation, or if we suffer a continued deterioration in our financial condition, we may be placed into a federal conservatorship or receivership by the FDIC.

 

The Company does not anticipate paying dividends for the foreseeable future, and all future dividends will be dependent on the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows, as well as capital regulations and dividend restrictions from the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, the FDIC, and the State Board. For information on dividends, including the Company’s policy on dividends, see “Market for Common Shares and Dividends” contained elsewhere in this Report.

 

As noted above, in July 2013, the Federal Reserve, the FDIC and the OCC each approved a final rule to implement the Basel III regulatory capital reforms among other changes required by the Dodd-Frank Act. The rule will apply to all national and state banks, such as the Bank, and savings associations and most bank holding companies and savings and loans holding companies, which we collectively refer to herein as “covered” banking organizations. Bank holding companies with less than $500 million in total consolidated assets, such as the Company, are not subject to the final rule, nor are savings and loan holding companies substantially engaged in commercial activities or insurance underwriting. The framework requires covered banking organizations to hold more and higher quality capital, which acts as a financial cushion to absorb losses, taking into account the impact of risk. The approved rule includes a new minimum ratio of common equity Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets of 4.5% as well as a common equity Tier 1 capital conservation buffer of 2.5% of risk-weighted assets. The rule also raises the minimum ratio of Tier 1 capital to risk-weighted assets from 4% to 6% and includes a minimum leverage ratio of 4% for covered banking institutions. For the largest, most internationally active banking organizations, the rule includes a new minimum supplementary leverage ratio that takes into account off-balance sheet exposures. In terms of quality of capital, the final rule emphasizes common equity tier 1 capital and implements strict eligibility criteria for regulatory capital instruments. It also changes the methodology for calculating risk-weighted assets to enhance risk sensitivity. The changes begin to take effect for the Bank in January 2015. The ultimate impact of the new capital standards on the Bank is currently being reviewed.

 

INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO

 

Management classifies investment securities as either held-to-maturity or available-for-sale based on our intentions and the Company’s ability to hold them until maturity. In determining such classifications, securities that management has the positive intent and the Company has the ability to hold until maturity are classified as held-to-maturity and carried at amortized cost. All other securities are designated as available-for-sale and carried at estimated fair value with unrealized gains and losses included in shareholders’ equity on an after-tax basis. As of December 31, 2012 and 2011, all securities were classified as available-for-sale.

 

 

56
 

INVESTMENT PORTFOLIO - continued

 

The portfolio of available-for-sale securities decreased $22.9 million, or 22.84%, from $100.2 million at December 31, 2011 to $77.3 million at December 31, 2012 as a result of management’s concerted effort to decrease the assets of the Bank to help improve its capital position. Our securities portfolio consisted primarily of high quality mortgage securities, government agency bonds, and high quality municipal bonds.

 

The following tables summarize the carrying value of investment securities as of the indicated dates and the weighted-average yields of those securities at December 31, 2012.

 

December 31, 2012 (in thousands)  Amortized Cost Due      
   Due  After One  After Five         
   Within  Through  Through  After Ten     Market
   One Year  Five Years  Ten Years  Years  Total  Value
Investment securities                  
Government sponsored enterprises  $—     $—     $6,497   $20,527   $27,024   $27,108 
Mortgage backed securities   —      —      —      44,557    44,557    44,462 
State and political subdivisions   —      —      3,724    1,845    5,569    5,750 
          Total  $—     $—     $10,221   $66,929   $77,150   $77,320 
                               
Weighted average yields                              
Government sponsored enterprises   —   %   —   %   2.72%   2.83%          
Mortgage backed securities   —   %   —   %   —  %   2.01%          
State and political subdivisions   —   %   —   %   3.87%   3.20%          
          Total   —   %   —   %   3.14%   2.30%   2.41%     
                               
                        Book    Market 
December 31, 2011 (in thousands)                       Value    Value 
Investment securities                              
Government sponsored enterprises                      $42,010   $42,142 
Mortgage backed securities                       50,706    47,206 
States and political subdivisions                       10,302    10,859 
          Total                      $103,018   $100,207 
                               
                        Book    Market 
December 31, 2010 (in thousands)                       Value    Value 
Investment securities                              
Government sponsored enterprises                      $55,661   $54,961 
Mortgage backed securities                       187,649    189,084 
States and political subdivisions                       22,060    21,145 
          Total                      $265,370   $265,190 

 

57
 

LOAN PORTFOLIO

 

The Company experienced a decline in its loan portfolio during 2012, resulting in a decrease of $64.8 million in gross loans. The decrease is due to loan payoffs, charge-offs of $18.5 million and transfers of loan balances to other real estate owned of $14.4 million. The loan-to-deposit ratio is used to monitor a financial institution’s potential profitability and efficiency of asset distribution and utilization. Generally, a higher loan-to-deposit ratio is indicative of higher interest income since loans typically yield a higher return than other interest-earning assets. The loan-to-deposit ratios were 69.34% and 74.77% at December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. The loans-to-total borrowed funds ratio was 63.31% and 68.14% at December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

The following table sets forth the composition of the loan portfolio by category for the five years ended December 31, 2012 and highlights the Company’s general emphasis on mortgage lending.

 

Loan Portfolio Summary               
December 31,  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008
(Dollars in thousands)               
Real estate:                         
  Commercial construction and land development  $58,274   $61,776   $82,028   $80,655   $46,574 
  Other commercial real estate   103,061    134,803    154,455    181,971    154,571 
  Residential construction   2,422    5,101    8,036    15,133    14,069 
  Other residential   89,184    104,307    122,813    125,258    98,949 
Commercial and industrial   41,200    52,272    65,896    74,433    95,290 
Consumer   8,093    8,736    12,446    15,871    19,655 
  Total gross loans  $302,234   $366,995   $445,674   $493,321   $429,108 

 

The primary component of our loan portfolio is loans collateralized by real estate, which made up approximately 83.69% of our loan portfolio at December 31, 2012. These loans are secured generally by first or second mortgages on residential, agricultural or commercial property. These loans include commercial real estate loans, which as of December 31, 2012 totaled $161.3 million, or 63.78% of our real estate loans. We have no foreign loans, and agricultural loans, as of December 31, 2012, are limited. There are no significant concentrations of loans in any particular individuals or industry or group of related individuals or industries.

 

Maturities and Sensitivity of Loans to Changes in Interest Rates:

 

The following table summarizes the loan maturity distribution, by type, at December 31, 2012 and related interest rate characteristics:

 

      Over      
      One Year      
December 31, 2012  One Year  Through  Over Five   
(Dollars in thousands)  or Less  Five Years  Years  Total
Commercial real estate  $57,106   $95,991   $8,238   $161,335 
Residential   22,964    34,883    33,759    91,606 
Commercial and industrial   22,257    16,179    2,764    41,200 
Consumer   2,750    5,249    94    8,093 
   $105,077   $152,302   $44,855   $302,234 
Loans maturing after one year with:                    
    Fixed interest rates            $142,678      
    Floating interest rates             54,479      
             $197,157      

 

58
 

LOAN PORTFOLIO - continued

 

Risk Elements

 

The downturn in general economic conditions over the past few years has resulted in increased loan delinquencies, defaults and foreclosures within our loan portfolio. The declining real estate market has had a significant impact on the performance of our loans secured by real estate. In some cases, this downturn has resulted in a significant impairment to the value of our collateral and our ability to sell the collateral upon foreclosure. Although the real estate collateral provides an alternate source of repayment in the event of default by the borrower, in our current market the value of the collateral has deteriorated during the time the credit is extended.  There is a risk that this trend will continue, which could result in additional losses of earnings and increases in our provision for loan losses and loans charged-offs.

 

Past due payments are often one of the first indicators of a problem loan. We perform a continuous review of our past due report in order to identify trends that can be resolved quickly before a loan becomes significantly past due. We determine past due and delinquency status based on the contractual terms of the note. When a borrower fails to make a scheduled loan payment, we attempt to cure the default through several methods including, but not limited to, collection contact and assessment of late fees.

 

Generally, a loan will be placed on nonaccrual status when it becomes 90 days past due as to principal or interest, or when management believes, after considering economic and business conditions and collection efforts, that the borrower’s financial condition is such that collection of the loan is doubtful. When a loan is placed in nonaccrual status, interest accruals are discontinued and income earned but not collected is reversed. Cash receipts on nonaccrual loans are not recorded as interest income, but are used to reduce principal. If the borrower is able to bring the account current, the loan is then placed back on regular accrual status.

 

For loans to be in excess of 90 days delinquent and still accruing interest, the borrowers must be either remitting payments although not able to get current, liquidation on loans deemed to be well secured must be near completion, or the Company must have a reason to believe that correction of the delinquency status by the borrower is near. The amount of both nonaccrual loans and loans past due 90 days or more were considered in computing the allowance for loan losses as of December 31, 2012.

 

Nonperforming loans include nonaccrual loans, loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing interest and any other troubled debt restructurings not included in the previous categories. Nonperforming assets include nonperforming loans plus other real estate that we own as a result of loan foreclosures.

 

Nonperforming loans were $71.2 million or 19.41% of total loans at the end of 2011. We believe that we have identified and aggressively worked through many of our credit issues. As a result, nonperforming loans at December 31, 2012 decreased to $52.7 million or 17.44% of total loans.

 

Nonperforming assets also decreased from 2011 to 2012. At December 31, 2012, nonperforming assets were $72.2 million compared to $86.9 million at December 31, 2011. As a percentage of total assets, nonperforming assets were 15.39% and 16.22% as of December 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

59
 

LOAN PORTFOLIO - continued

 

The following table summarizes nonperforming assets for the five years ended December 31, 2012:

 

Nonperforming Assets  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008
(Dollars in thousands)               
  Nonaccrual loans  $22,567   $44,682   $25,197   $23,138   $9,040 
  Troubled debt restructurings   29,994    26,471    32,148    91    —   
  Loans past due 90 days or more and still accruing interest   157    76    —      —      —   
      Total nonperforming loans   52,718    71,229    57,345    23,229    9,040 
Other real estate owned   19,464    15,665    16,891    6,432    2,965 
      Total nonperforming assets  $72,182   $86,894   $74,236   $29,661   $12,005 
                          
Nonperforming assets to total assets   15.39%   16.22%   9.43%   3.90%   1.86%
Nonperforming loans to total loans   17.44%   19.41%   13.32%   4.72%   2.11%

 

Credit Risk Management

 

Another method used to monitor the loan portfolio is credit grading. Credit risk entails both general risk, which is inherent in the process of lending, and risk that is specific to individual borrowers. The management of credit risk involves the processes of loan underwriting and loan administration. The Company seeks to manage credit risk through a strategy of making loans within the Company’s primary marketplace and within the Company’s limits of expertise. Although management seeks to avoid concentrations of credit by loan type or industry through diversification, a substantial portion of the borrowers’ ability to honor the terms of their loans is dependent on the business and economic conditions in Horry County in South Carolina and Columbus and Brunswick Counties in North Carolina. A continuation of the economic downturn could result in the deterioration of the quality of our loan portfolio and reduce our level of deposits, which in turn would have a negative impact on our business. Additionally, since real estate is considered by the Company as the most desirable nonmonetary collateral, a significant portion of the Company’s loans are collateralized by real estate; however, the cash flow of the borrower or the business enterprise is generally considered as the primary source of repayment. Generally, the value of real estate is not considered by the Company as the primary source of repayment for performing loans. The Company also seeks to limit total exposure to individual and affiliated borrowers. The Company seeks to manage risk specific to individual borrowers through the loan underwriting process and through an ongoing analysis of the borrower’s ability to service the debt as well as the value of the pledged collateral.

 

The Company’s loan officers and loan administration staff are charged with monitoring the Company’s loan portfolio and identifying changes in the economy or in a borrower’s circumstances which may affect the ability to repay the debt or the value of the pledged collateral. In order to assess and monitor the degree of risk in the Company’s loan portfolio, several credit risk identification and monitoring processes are utilized. The Company assesses credit risk initially through the assignment of a risk grade to each loan based upon an assessment of the borrower’s financial capacity to service the debt and the presence and value of any collateral. Commercial loans are individually graded at origination and credit grades are reviewed on a regular basis in accordance with our loan policy. Consumer loans are assigned a “pass” credit rating unless something within the loan warrants a specific classification grade.

 

Credit grading is adjusted during the life of the loan to reflect economic and individual changes having an impact on the borrowers’ abilities to honor the terms of their commitments. Management uses the risk grades as a tool for identifying known and inherent losses in the loan portfolio and for determining the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses.

 

60
 

LOAN PORTFOLIO - continued

 

The following table summarizes management’s internal credit risk grades, by portfolio class, as of December 31, 2012.

 

      Commercial         
(Dollars in thousands)  Commercial  Real Estate  Consumer  Residential  Total
Grade 1 - Minimal  $1,345   $—     $822   $—     $2,167 
Grade 2 – Modest   546    2,412    67    2,517    5,542 
Grade 3 – Average   4,508    5,871    228    4,094    14,701 
Grade 4 – Satisfactory   18,554    63,658    6,038    53,955    142,205 
Grade 5 – Watch   6,997    32,640    366    10,923    50,926 
Grade 6 – Special Mention   2,603    10,893    258    8,443    22,197 
Grade 7 – Substandard   6,544    44,521    314    11,674    63,053 
Grade 8 – Doubtful   103    1,340    —      —      1,443 
Grade 9 – Loss   —      —      —      —      —   
    Total Loans  $41,200   $161,335   $8,093   $91,606   $302,234 

 

Loans graded one through four are considered “pass” credits. As of December 31, 2012, approximately $164.6 million, or 54.47%, of the loan portfolio had a credit grade of Minimal, Modest, Average or Satisfactory. For loans to qualify for this grade, they must be performing relatively close to expectations, with no significant departures from the intended source and timing of repayment.

 

Loans with a credit grade of “watch” and “special mention” are not considered classified; however, they are categorized as a watch list credit and are considered potential problem loans. This classification is utilized by us when we have an initial concern about the financial health of a borrower.  These loans are designated as such in order to be monitored more closely than other credits in our portfolio. We then gather current financial information about the borrower and evaluate our current risk in the credit.  We will then either reclassify the loan as “substandard” or back to its original risk rating after a review of the information.  There are times when we may leave the loan on the watch list, if, in management’s opinion, there are risks that cannot be fully evaluated without the passage of time, and we determine to review the loan on a more regular basis.  Loans on the watch list are not considered problem loans until they are determined by management to be classified as substandard. As of December 31, 2012, loans with a credit grade of “watch” and “special mention” totaled $73.1 million. Watch list loans are considered potential problem loans and are monitored as they may develop into problem loans in the future. 

 

Loans graded “substandard” or greater are considered classified credits. At December 31, 2012, classified loans totaled $64.5 million, with $57.5 million being collateralized by real estate. Classified credits are evaluated for impairment on a quarterly basis.

 

We identify impaired loans through our normal internal loan review process. A loan is considered impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that we will be unable to collect the scheduled payments of principal or interest when due, according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Factors considered by management in determining impairment include payment status, collateral value, and the probability of collecting scheduled principal and interest payments when due. Impairment is measured on a loan-by-loan basis by calculating either the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate, the loan’s obtainable market price, or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. Any resultant shortfall is charged to provision for loan losses and is classified as a specific reserve. When an impaired loan is ultimately charged-off, the charge-off is taken against the specific reserve.

 

61
 

LOAN PORTFOLIO - continued

 

Impaired loans are valued on a nonrecurring basis at the lower of cost or market value of the underlying collateral. Market values were obtained using independent appraisals, updated in accordance with our reappraisal policy, or other market data such as recent offers to the borrower. During 2012, the recorded investment in impaired loans was $61.6 million compared to $80.4 million during 2011.

 

Troubled debt restructurings are loans which have been restructured from their original contractual terms and include concessions that would not otherwise have been granted outside of the financial difficulty of the borrower. Concessions can relate to the contractual interest rate, maturity date, or payment structure of the note. As part of our workout plan for individual loan relationships, we may restructure loan terms to assist borrowers facing challenges in the current economic environment. The purpose of a troubled debt restructuring is to facilitate ultimate repayment of the loan.

 

At December 31, 2012, the principal balance of troubled debt restructurings totaled $44.9 million. At December 31, 2012, $30.0 million of these restructured loans were performing as expected under the new terms, and $14.9 million were considered to be nonperforming and evaluated for reserves on the basis of the fair value of the collateral A troubled debt restructuring can be removed from nonperforming status once there is sufficient history of demonstrating the borrower can service the credit under market terms. We currently consider sufficient history to be approximately six months.

 

Provision and Allowance for Loan Losses

 

Management has established an allowance for loan losses through a provision for loan losses charged to expense on our statements of operations. The allowance represents an amount which management believes will be adequate to absorb probable losses on existing loans that may become uncollectible. Management does not allocate specific percentages of our allowance for loan losses to the various categories of loans but evaluates the adequacy on an overall portfolio basis utilizing several factors. The primary factor considered is the credit risk grading system, which is applied to each loan. The amount of both nonaccrual loans and loans past due 90 days or more is also considered. The historical loan loss experience, the size of our lending portfolio, changes in the lending policies and procedures, changes in volume or type of credits, changes in volume/severity of problem loans, quality of loan review and board of director oversight, concentrations of credit, and peer group comparisons, and current and anticipated economic conditions are also considered in determining the provision for loan losses. The amount of the allowance is adjusted periodically based on changing circumstances. The Bank changed its historical look back period during the quarter ended December 31, 2012 from twelve quarters to six quarters. Management believes this change more accurately reflects the loss history of the loan portfolio. Recognized losses are charged to the allowance for loan losses, while subsequent recoveries are added to the allowance.

 

Management regularly monitors past due and classified loans. However, it should be noted that no assurances can be made that future charges to the allowance for loan losses or provisions for loan losses may not be significant to a particular accounting period. Management’s judgment as to the adequacy of the allowance is based upon a number of assumptions about future events which it believes to be reasonable, but which may or may not prove to be accurate.

 

Because of the inherent uncertainty of assumptions made during the evaluation process, there can be no assurance that loan losses in future periods will not exceed the allowance for loan losses or that additional allocations will not be required. Our losses will undoubtedly vary from our estimates, and there is a possibility that charge-offs in future periods will exceed the allowance for loan losses as estimated at any point in time.

 

The Bank reserved $5.6 million for impaired loans for the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to $12.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. Net charge-offs decreased slightly from $18.6 million during 2011 to $17.6 million during 2012. A provision of $10.5 million was expensed in 2012 compared to $25.3 million in 2011. Management believes the allowance is adequate at $14.2 million as of December 31, 2012. 

 

62
 

LOAN PORTFOLIO - continued

 

The following table presents the Allowance for Loan Losses by loan category and the loan category as a percentage of total loans. Allocation of a portion of the allowance to one category of loans does not preclude its availability to absorb losses in other categories.

 

   December 31,
   2012  2011  2010  2009  2008
(in thousands)  $  %(1)  $  %(1)  $  %(1)  $  %(1)  $  %(1)
Commercial  $1,982    13.6%  $3,239    14.2%  $1,822    14.8%  $1,152    15.1%  $981    22.2%
Commercial Real Estate   7,587    53.4%   10,240    53.6%   7,237    53.1%   2,916    53.2%   2,070    46.9%
Consumer   124    2.7%   103    2.4%   131    2.8%   217    3.2%   202    4.6%
Residential   4,457    30.3%   7,596    29.8%   5,299    29.3%   3,240    28.5%   1,163    26.3%
   $14,150    100.0%  $21,178    100.0%  $14,489    100.0%  $7,525    100.0%  $4,416    100.0%

 

(1) Loan category as a percentage of total loans.

The following table summarizes the activity related to our allowance for loan losses. 

(Dollars in thousands)  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008
Total loans outstanding at end of period  $302,234   $366,995   $445,674   $493,321   $429,108 
Average loans outstanding  $337,445   $410,043   $483,570   $469,675   $385,277 
                          
Balance of allowance for loan losses at beginning of period  $21,178   $14,489   $7,525   $4,416   $3,535 
                          
Charge offs:                         
Real estate   (15,193)   (16,217)   (14,080)   (8,056)   (385)
Commercial   (3,242)   (3,229)   (2,396)   (1,448)   (550)
Consumer and credit card   (106)   (193)   (222)   (248)   (294)
Other loans   —      (196)   (28)   (56)   (23)
Total charge-offs   (18,541)   (19,835)   (16,726)   (9,808)   (1,252)
                          
Recoveries of loans previously charged off   983    1,253    606    2,556    379 
Net charge-offs   (17,558)   (18,582)   (16,120)   (7,252)   (873)
                          
Provision charged to operations   10,530    25,271    23,084    10,361    1,754 
Balance of allowance for loan losses at end of period  $14,150   $21,178   $14,489   $7,525   $4,416 
                          
Ratios:                         
Net charge-offs to average loans outstanding   5.20%   4.53%   3.33%   1.54%   0.23%
Net charge-offs to loans at end of year   5.81%   5.06%   3.62%   1.47%   0.20%
Allowance for loan losses to average loans   4.19%   5.16%   3.00%   1.60%   1.15%
Allowance for loan losses to loans at end of year   4.68%   5.77%   3.25%   1.53%   1.03%
Net charge-offs to allowance for loan losses   124.08%   87.74%   111.26%   96.37%   19.77%
Net charge-offs to provisions for loan losses   166.74%   73.53%   69.83%   69.99%   49.77%

 

63
 

AVERAGE DAILY DEPOSITS

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s average daily deposits during the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011, and 2010. These totals include time deposits $100 thousand and over, which at December 31, 2012 totaled $155.8 million. Of this total, scheduled maturities within three months were $27.1 million; over three through twelve months were $61.4 million; and over twelve months were $67.3 million.

 

The adverse economic environment has also placed greater pressure on our deposits, and we have taken steps to decrease our reliance on brokered deposits, while at the same time the competition for local deposits among banks in our market has been increasing. We generally obtain out-of-market time deposits of $100 thousand or more through brokers with whom we maintain ongoing relationships. However, due to the Consent Order, we may not accept, renew or roll over brokered deposits unless a waiver is granted by the FDIC. As of December 31, 2012, we had brokered deposits of $43.1 million as compared to $76 million as of December 31, 2011. We may need to find other sources of liquidity to replace these deposits as they mature. Secondary sources of liquidity may include proceeds from FHLB advances, Qwickrate CDs, and federal funds lines of credit from correspondent banks.

 

   2012  2011  2010
      Average     Average     Average
   Average  Rate  Average  Rate  Average  Rate
(Dollars in thousands)  Amount  Paid  Amount  Paid  Amount  Paid
Noninterest-bearing demand  $36,681    n/a   $41,121    n/a   $39,546    n/a 
Interest-bearing transaction accounts   43,086    0.22%   43,257    0.23%   41,316    0.26%
Money market savings account   105,727    0.43%   155,481    0.63%   189,600    1.65%
Other savings accounts   7,961    0.25%   7,485    0.25%   6,959    0.33%
Time deposits   282,543    1.20%   288,675    1.70%   340,385    2.00%
      Total average deposits  $475,998        $536,019        $617,806      

 

ADVANCES FROM THE FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK

 

The following table summarizes the Company’s FHLB borrowings for the years ended December 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010.

 

   Maximum     Weighted   
   Outstanding     Average   
   at any  Average  Interest  Balance
(Dollars in thousands)  Month End  Balance  Rate  December 31
2012                    
Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank  $22,000   $22,000    3.39%  $22,000 
2011                    
Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank  $112,200   $49,618    3.39%  $22,000 
2010                    
Advances from Federal Home Loan Bank  $118,800   $110,862    2.58%  $104,200 

 

Advances from the FHLB are collateralized by one-to-four family residential mortgage loans, certain commercial real estate loans, certain securities in the Bank’s investment portfolio and the Company’s investment in FHLB stock. Although we expect to continue using FHLB advances as a secondary funding source, core deposits will continue to be our primary funding source. Of the $22,000,000 advances from the FHLB outstanding at December 31, 2012, $5,000,000 have scheduled principal reductions in 2014, $12,000,000 in 2018, and the remainder in 2019. As a result of negative financial performance indicators, there is a risk that the Bank’s ability to borrow from the FHLB could be curtailed or eliminated. Although to date the Bank has not been denied advances from the FHLB, the Bank has had its collateral maintenance requirements altered to reflect the increase in our credit risk. Thus, we can make no assurances that this funding source will continue to be available to us.

64
 

JUNIOR SUBORDINATED DEBENTURES

 

On December 21, 2004, HCSB Financial Trust I (the “Trust”), a non-consolidated subsidiary of the Company, issued and sold a total of 6,000 trust preferred securities, with $1,000 liquidation amount per capital security (the “Capital Securities”), to institutional buyers in a pooled trust preferred issue. The Capital Securities, which are reported on the consolidated balance sheet as junior subordinated debentures, generated proceeds of $6.0 million. The Trust loaned these proceeds to the Company to use for general corporate purposes. The junior subordinated debentures qualify as Tier 1 capital under Federal Reserve Board guidelines, subject to limitations. See Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements for more information about the terms of the junior subordinated debentures.

 

Debt issuance costs, net of accumulated amortization, from junior subordinated debentures totaled $80 thousand and $84 thousand at December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively, and are included in other assets on the consolidated balance sheet. Amortizations of debt issuance costs from junior subordinated debentures totaled $4 thousand for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, and are reported in other expenses on the consolidated statements of operations for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011.

 

Due to the Company’s current financial condition, as of February 2011, the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond required the Company to defer interest payments on the Capital Securities. The Company may defer interest payments on the Capital Securities for up to 20 consecutive quarterly periods, although interest will continue to accrue on the Capital Securities and interest on such deferred interest will accrue and compound quarterly from the date such deferred interest would have been payable were it not for the extension period. The Company has deferred interest payments on the Capital Securities for eight consecutive interest payment periods.

 

SUBORDINATED DEBENTURES

 

On July 31, 2010, the Company completed a private placement of subordinated promissory notes that totaled $12.1 million. The notes initially bear interest at a rate of 9% per annum payable semiannually on April 5th and October 5th and are callable by the Company four years after the date of issuance and mature 10 years from the date of issuance. After October 5, 2014 and until maturity, the notes bear interest at a rate equal to the current Prime Rate in effect, as published by the Wall Street Journal, plus 3%; provided, that the rate of interest shall not be less than 8% per annum or more than 12% per annum. The subordinated notes have been structured to fully count as Tier 2 regulatory capital on a consolidated basis.

 

The Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond has prohibited the Company from paying interest due on the subordinated notes since October 2011 and, as a result, the Company has deferred interest payments in the amount of approximately $1.5 million.  The Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond may prohibit the Company from making interest payments on the subordinated notes in the future given the financial condition of the Bank.

 

ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL REPORTING ISSUES

 

We have adopted various accounting policies which govern the application of accounting principles generally accepted in the United States in the preparation of our financial statements. Our significant accounting policies are described in the footnotes to the consolidated financial statements at December 31, 2012, as filed on our annual report on Form 10-K. Certain accounting policies involve significant judgments and assumptions by us which have a material impact on the carrying value of certain assets and liabilities. We consider these accounting policies to be critical accounting policies. The judgments and assumptions we use are based on historical experience and other factors, which we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Because of the nature of the judgments and assumptions we make, actual results could differ from these judgments and estimates which could have a material impact on our carrying values of assets and liabilities and our results of operations.

65
 

ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL REPORTING ISSUES - continued

 

We believe the allowance for loan losses is a critical accounting policy that requires significant judgment and estimates used in preparation of our consolidated financial statements. Refer to the portion of this discussion that addresses our allowance for loan losses for a description of our processes and methodology for determining our allowance for loan losses.

 

Income tax provision is also an accounting policy that requires judgment as the Company seeks strategies to minimize the tax effect of implementing their business strategies. The Company’s tax returns are subject to examination by both federal and state authorities. Such examinations may result in assessment of additional taxes, interest and penalties. As a result, the ultimate outcome, and the corresponding financial statement impact, can be difficult to predict with accuracy.

 

Fair value determination and other-than-temporary impairment is subject to management’s evaluation to determine if it is probable that all amounts due according to contractual terms will be collected to determine if any other-than-temporary impairment exists. The process of evaluating other-than-temporary impairment is inherently judgmental, involving the weighing of positive and negative factors and evidence that may be objective or subjective.

 

 

66
 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

 

The Board of Directors

HCSB Financial Corporation and Subsidiary

Loris, South Carolina

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of HCSB Financial Corporation and Subsidiary (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income (loss), changes in shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for the years then ended. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. Our audit included consideration of internal control over financial reporting as a basis for designing audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of HCSB Financial Corporation and Subsidiary as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for the years then ended in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

 

As discussed in Note 2 to the financial statements, the Company has suffered recurring losses that have eroded regulatory capital ratios and the Company’s wholly owned subsidiary, Horry County State Bank, is under a regulatory Consent Order with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) that requires, among other provisions, capital ratios to be maintained at certain levels. As of December 31, 2012 the Company’s subsidiary is considered critically undercapitalized based on its regulatory capital levels. These considerations about the Company’s future operations and Management’s plans are further discussed in Note 2. These financial statements do not include any adjustments that would be necessary should the Company be unable to maintain regulatory capital at certain levels.

 

 

/s/ Elliott Davis, LLC

 

Columbia, South Carolina

May 19, 2014

67
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   December 31,
(Dollars in thousands except share amounts)  2012  2011
Assets:          
  Cash and cash equivalents:          
    Cash and due from banks  $46,600   $33,672 
  Investment securities:          
    Securities available-for-sale   77,320    100,207 
    Nonmarketable equity securities   1,983    3,975 
      Total investment securities   79,303    104,182 
  Loans receivable   302,234    366,995 
    Less allowance for loan losses   (14,150)   (21,178)
      Loans, net   288,084    345,817 
  Premises, furniture and equipment, net   21,694    22,514 
  Accrued interest receivable   2,370    2,776 
  Cash value of life insurance   10,655    10,285 
  Other real estate owned   19,464    15,665 
  Other assets   826    787 
      Total assets  $468,996   $535,698 
Liabilities:          
  Deposits:          
    Noninterest-bearing transaction accounts  $33,103   $37,029 
    Interest-bearing transaction accounts   43,053    44,989 
    Money market savings accounts   84,776    124,987 
    Other savings accounts   7,900    7,615 
    Time deposits $100 and over   155,786    131,561 
    Other time deposits   111,243    144,672 
      Total deposits   435,861    490,853 
  Repurchase agreements   1,303    7,492 
  Advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank   22,000    22,000 
  Subordinated debentures   12,062    12,062 
  Junior subordinated debentures   6,186    6,186 
  Accrued interest payable   2,207    1,015 
  Other liabilities   1,139    1,306 
      Total liabilities   480,758    540,914 
Commitments and contingencies (Notes 5, 13, & 14)          
Shareholders’ Equity:          
Preferred stock, $1,000 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized; 12,895 issued and outstanding   12,572    12,355 
Common stock, $0.01 par value, 500,000,000 and 10,000,000 shares authorized; 3,738,337 shares issued and outstanding   37    37 
  Capital surplus   30,224    30,224 
  Common stock warrant   1,012    1,012 
  Retained deficit   (55,777)   (46,033)
  Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)   170    (2,811)
      Total shareholders’ deficit   (11,762)   (5,216)
      Total liabilities and shareholders’ deficit  $468,996   $535,698 

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

68
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

   Years ended December 31,
(Dollars in thousands except share amounts)  2012  2011
Interest income:          
  Loans, including fees  $17,301   $20,943 
  Investment securities:          
    Taxable   2,818    4,123 
    Tax-exempt   115    472 
    Nonmarketable equity securities   47    53 
  Other interest income   90    63 
      Total   20,371    25,654 
Interest expense:          
  Deposits   3,961    6,011 
  Borrowings   2,300    2,913 
      Total   6,261    8,924 
Net interest income   14,110    16,730 
Provision for loan losses   10,530    25,271 
Net interest income (loss) after provision for loan losses   3,580    (8,541)
Noninterest income:          
  Service charges on deposit accounts   1,114    1,307 
  Credit life insurance commissions   18    17 
  Gains on sales of residential mortgage loans   375    567 
  Brokerage commissions   140    395 
  Other fees and commissions   402    390 
  Gains on sales of securities available-for-sale   1,643    2,952 
  Income from cash value of life insurance   465    476 
  Net gains (losses) on sales of assets   155    (1)
  Other operating income   262    113 
      Total   4,574    6,216 
Noninterest expenses:          
  Salaries and employee benefits   6,093    6,859 
  Net occupancy   1,220    1,250 
  Furniture and equipment   1,171    1,331 
  Marketing and advertising   22    150 
  Net cost of operations of other real estate owned   3,539    3,650 
  Prepayment penalties on FHLB advances   —      2,554 
  FDIC insurance premiums   1,759    2,391 
  Other operating expenses   3,877    3,509 
      Total   17,681    21,694 
Loss before income taxes   (9,527)   (24,019)
Income tax expense   —      4,998 
Net loss   (9,527)   (29,017)
Accretion of preferred stock to redemption value   (217)   (203)
Preferred dividends   (652)   (652)
Net loss available to common shareholders  $(10,396)  $(29,872)
Net loss per common share          
  Basic  $(2.78)  $(7.98)
  Diluted  $(2.78)  $(7.98)
Weighted average common shares outstanding          
  Basic and diluted   3,738,337    3,742,413 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

69
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

 

   Years ended December 31,
(Dollars in thousands)  2012  2011
Net loss  $(9,527)  $(29,017)
Other comprehensive income (loss):          
  Unrealized gains on securities available-for-sale:          
    Unrealized holding gains arising during the period, pretax   3,815    320 
      Tax expense   —      (118)
    Reclassification to realized gains   (1,643)   (2,952)
      Tax expense   —      1,092 
  Valuation allowance on deferred tax asset on available-for-sale securities   809    (1,040)
Other comprehensive income (loss)   2,981    (2,698)
Comprehensive loss  $(6,546)  $(31,715)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

70
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

Years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011

 

                           Accumulated   
         Common        Nonvested        Other   
   Common Stock  Stock  Preferred Stock  Restricted  Capital  Retained  Comprehensive   
   Shares  Amount  Warrant  Shares  Amount  Stock  Surplus  Deficit  Income(Loss)  Total
(Dollars in thousands)                              
Balance, December 31, 2010   3,780,845   $38   $1,012    12,895   $12,152   $(564)  $30,787   $(16,813)  $(113)  $26,499 
                                                   
Net loss   —      —      —      —      —      —      —      (29,017)   —      (29,017)
Other comprehensive loss   —      —      —      —      —      —      —      —      (2,698)   (2,698)
Accretion of preferred stock to redemption value   —      —      —      —      203    —      —      (203)   —      —   
Termination of employee stock option plans   (42,508)   (1)   —      —      —      564    (563)   —      —      —   
Balance, December 31, 2011   3,738,337    37    1,012    12,895    12,355    —      30,224    (46,033)   (2,811)   (5,216)
Net loss   —      —      —      —      —      —      —      (9,527)   —      (9,527)
Other comprehensive income   —      —      —      —      —      —      —      —      2,981    2,981 
Accretion of preferred stock to redemption value   —      —      —      —      217    —      —      (217)   —      —   
Balance, December 31, 2012   3,738,337   $37   $1,012    12,895   $12,572   $—     $30,224   $(55,777)  $170   $(11,762)

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

71
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

(Dollars in thousands)  Years ended December 31,
   2012  2011
Cash flows from operating activities:          
Net loss  $(9,527)  $(29,017)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash provided by operating activities:          
Provision for loan losses   10,530    25,271 
Depreciation expense   923    1,015 
Decrease on deferred income tax   —      4,862 
Amortization net of accretion on investments   (180)   (228)
Gains on sales of securities available-for-sale   (1,643)   (2,952)
Losses on sales of other real estate owned   658    551 
Writedowns of other real estate owned   2,760    2,243 
Gain (loss) on sale of other assets   (155)   1 
Origination in loans held for sale   —      (26,183)
Sale or paydowns of loans held for sale   —      25,688 
Decrease in interest receivable   406    1,700 
Increase (decrease) in interest payable   1,192    (237)
Decrease in other assets   116    5,084 
Income, net of mortality costs on cash value of life insurance   (370)   (389)
Decrease in other liabilities   (167)   (329)
Net cash provided by operating activities   4,543    7,080 
Cash flows from investing activities:          
Purchases of securities available-for-sale   (78,053)   (52,260)
Maturities and paydowns of securities available-for-sale   59,016    36,385 
Proceeds from sales of securities available-for-sale   46,728    181,407 
Net decrease in loans receivable   32,805    48,527 
Purchase of premises, furniture and equipment, net   (103)   (140)
Proceeds from sales of other real estate owned   7,181    10,472 
Redemptions of nonmarketable equity securities   1,992    2,101 
Net cash provided by investing activities   69,566    226,492 
           
Cash flows from financing activities:          
Net decrease in demand deposits, interest-bearing transaction accounts and savings accounts   (45,788)   (69,757)
Net decrease in time deposits   (9,204)   (68,351)
Net decrease in FHLB advances   —      (82,200)
Net increase (decrease) in repurchase agreements   (6,189)   846 
Net cash used by financing activities   (61,181)   (219,462)
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents   12,928    14,110 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year   33,672    19,562 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of year  $46,600   $33,672 
           
Cash paid during the year for:          
Income taxes  $—     $—   
Interest  $5,069   $9,161 
           
Noncash investing and financing activities:          
Transfers of loans to other real estate owned  $14,398   $12,040 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

72
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 - ORGANIZATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Presentation and Consolidation - The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of HCSB Financial Corporation which was incorporated on June 10, 1999 (the “Company”) to serve as a bank holding company for its wholly owned subsidiary, Horry County State Bank (the “Bank”). The Bank was incorporated on December 18, 1987, and opened for operations on January 4, 1988. The principal business activity of the Company is to provide commercial banking services in Horry County, South Carolina, and in Columbus and Brunswick Counties, North Carolina. The Bank is a state-chartered bank, and its deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the “FDIC”). HCSB Financial Trust I (the “Trust”) is a special purpose subsidiary organized for the sole purpose of issuing trust preferred securities. The operations of the Trust have not been consolidated in these financial statements.

 

Management’s Estimates - In preparing the consolidated financial statements, management is required to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities as of the balance sheet date and income and expenses for the period. Actual results could differ significantly from those estimates.

 

Material estimates that are particularly susceptible to significant change relate to the determination of the allowance for loan losses, including valuation allowances for impaired loans, and the carrying amount of real estate acquired in connection with foreclosures or in satisfaction of loans. Management must also make estimates in determining the estimated useful lives and methods for depreciating premises and equipment.

 

While management uses available information to recognize losses on loans and foreclosed real estate, future additions to the allowance may be necessary based on changes in local economic conditions. In addition, regulatory agencies, as an integral part of their examination process, periodically review the Company’s allowances for losses on loans and foreclosed real estate. Such agencies may require the Company to recognize additions to the allowances based on their judgments about information available to them at the time of their examination. Because of these factors, it is reasonably possible that the allowances for losses on loans and foreclosed real estate may change materially in the near term.

 

Investment Securities - Investment securities available-for-sale owned by the Company are carried at amortized cost and adjusted to their estimated fair value. The unrealized gain or loss is recorded in shareholders’ equity net of any deferred tax effects. Management does not actively trade securities classified as available-for-sale, but intends to hold these securities for an indefinite period of time and may sell them prior to maturity to achieve certain objectives. Reductions in fair value considered by management to be other than temporary are reported as a realized loss and a reduction in the cost basis in the security. The adjusted cost basis of securities available-for-sale is determined by specific identification and is used in computing the realized gain or loss from a sales transaction.

 

Nonmarketable Equity Securities - Nonmarketable equity securities include the Company’s investments in the stock of the Federal Home Loan Bank (the “FHLB”). The stocks are carried at cost because they have no quoted market value and no ready market exists. Investment in Federal Home Loan Bank stock is a condition of borrowing from the Federal Home Loan Bank, and the stock is pledged to collateralize the borrowings. Dividends received on Federal Home Loan Bank stock are included as a separate component in interest income.

 

At December 31, 2012 and 2011, the investment in Federal Home Loan Bank stock was $1.8 million and $3.8 million, respectively. The Company also had an investment in the holding company of a community bank, which was written down to $200 in 2011 and to zero in 2012. It was originally purchased at $25 thousand. Also included in nonmarketable equities is investment in the Trust, which totaled $186 thousand at December 31, 2012 and 2011.

73
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 - ORGANIZATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - continued

 

Loans Receivable - Loans receivable are stated at their unpaid principal balance less any charge-offs. Interest income on loans is computed based upon the unpaid principal balance. Interest income is recorded in the period earned.

 

The accrual of interest income is generally discontinued when a loan becomes contractually 90 days past due as to principal or interest. Management may elect to continue the accrual of interest when the estimated net realizable value of collateral exceeds the principal balance and accrued interest.

 

Loan origination and commitment fees and certain direct loan origination costs (principally salaries and employee benefits) are deferred and amortized to income over the contractual life of the related loans or commitments, adjusted for prepayments, using the straight-line method.

 

Loans are impaired when it is probable that a creditor will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. All loans are subject to these criteria except for smaller balance homogeneous loans that are collectively evaluated for impairment and loans measured at fair value or at the lower of cost or fair value. The Company considers its consumer installment portfolio and home equity lines as such exceptions. Therefore, loans within the real estate and commercial loan portfolios are reviewed individually.

 

Impairment of a loan is measured based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the loan’s effective interest rate or the fair value of the collateral if the loan is collateral dependent. When management determines that a loan is impaired, the difference between the Company’s investment in the related loan and the present value of the expected future cash flows, or the fair value of the collateral, is charged off with a corresponding entry to the allowance for loan losses. The accrual of interest is discontinued on an impaired loan when management determines the borrower may be unable to meet payments as they become due.

 

Concentrations of Credit Risk - Financial instruments, which potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk, consist principally of loans receivable, investment securities, federal funds sold and amounts due from banks.

 

The Company makes loans to individuals and small businesses for various personal and commercial purposes primarily throughout Horry County in South Carolina and Columbus and Brunswick counties of North Carolina. The Company’s loan portfolio is not concentrated in loans to any single borrower or a relatively small number of borrowers. Additionally, management is not aware of any concentrations of loans to classes of borrowers or industries that would be similarly affected by economic conditions except for loans secured by residential and commercial real estate and commercial and industrial non-real estate loans. These concentrations of residential and commercial real estate loans and commercial and industrial non-real estate loans totaled $252.9 million and $41.2 million, respectively, at December 31, 2012, representing 83.69% and 13.63%, respectively, of gross loans receivable for the Company at December 31, 2012.

 

In addition to monitoring potential concentrations of loans to particular borrowers or groups of borrowers, industries and geographic regions, management monitors exposure to credit risk from concentrations of lending products and practices such as loans that subject borrowers to substantial payment increases (e.g. principal deferral periods, loans with initial interest-only periods, etc.), and loans with high loan-to-value ratios. Management has determined that there is no concentration of credit risk associated with its lending policies or practices. Additionally, there are industry practices that could subject the Company to increased credit risk should economic conditions change over the course of a loan’s life. For example, the Company makes variable rate loans and fixed rate principal-amortizing loans with maturities prior to the loan being fully paid (i.e. balloon payment loans). These loans are underwritten and monitored to manage the associated risks. Therefore, management believes that these particular practices do not subject the Company to unusual credit risk.

 

74
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 - ORGANIZATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - continued

 

The Company’s investment portfolio consists principally of obligations of the United States, its agencies or its corporations and general obligation municipal securities. In the opinion of management, there is no concentration of credit risk in its investment portfolio. The Company places its deposits and correspondent accounts with and sells its federal funds to high quality institutions. Management believes credit risk associated with correspondent accounts is not significant.

 

Allowance for Loan Losses - The allowance for loan losses is established as losses are estimated to have occurred through a provision for loan losses charged to earnings. Loan losses are charged against the allowance when management believes the uncollectability of a loan balance is confirmed. Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the allowance. The allowance for loan losses is evaluated on a regular basis by management and is based upon management’s periodic review of the collectability of the loans in light of historical experiences, the nature and volume of the loan portfolio, adverse situations that may affect the borrower’s ability to repay, estimated value of any underlying collateral and prevailing economic conditions. This evaluation is inherently subjective as it requires estimates that are susceptible to significant revision as more information becomes available. Management’s judgments about the adequacy of the allowance are based on numerous assumptions about current events, which management believes to be reasonable, but which may or may not prove to be accurate. Thus, there can be no assurance that loan losses in future periods will not exceed the current allowance amount or that future increases in the allowance will not be required. No assurance can be given that management’s ongoing evaluation of the loan portfolio in light of changing economic conditions and other relevant circumstances will not require significant future additions to the allowance, thus adversely affecting the operating results of the Company.

 

The allowance is subject to examination by regulatory agencies, which may consider such factors as the methodology used to determine adequacy and the size of the allowance relative to that of peer institutions, and other adequacy tests. In addition, such regulatory agencies could require the Company to adjust its allowance based on information available to them at the time of their examination.

 

The methodology used to determine the reserve for unfunded lending commitments, which is included in other liabilities, is inherently similar to that used to determine the allowance for loan losses adjusted for factors specific to binding commitments, including the probability of funding and historical loss ratio.

 

Premises, Furniture and Equipment - Premises, furniture and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation. The provision for depreciation is computed by the straight-line method. Rates of depreciation are generally based on the following estimated useful lives: buildings - 40 years; furniture and equipment - 3 to 25 years. The cost of assets sold or otherwise disposed of and the related accumulated depreciation is eliminated from the accounts, and the resulting gains or losses are reflected in the income statement.

 

Maintenance and repairs are charged to current expense as incurred, and the costs of major renewals and improvements are capitalized.

 

Other Real Estate Owned - Other real estate owned includes real estate acquired through foreclosure. Other real estate owned is initially recorded at appraised value. Any write-downs at the dates of acquisition are charged to the allowance for loan losses. Expenses to maintain such assets, subsequent write-downs, and gains and losses on disposal are included in other expenses.

 

Income and Expense Recognition - The accrual method of accounting is used for all significant categories of income and expense. Immaterial amounts of insurance commissions and other miscellaneous fees are reported when received.

 

75
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 - ORGANIZATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - continued

 

Income Taxes – The Company files consolidated federal and state income tax returns. Federal income tax expense or benefit has been allocated to subsidiaries on a separate return basis. The Company accounts for income taxes based on two components of income tax expense: current and deferred. Current income tax expense approximates taxes to be paid or refunded for the current period and includes income tax expense related to uncertain tax positions, if any.

 

Deferred income taxes are determined using the balance sheet method. Under this method, the net deferred tax asset or liability is based on the tax impacts of the differences between the book and tax bases of assets and liabilities and recognizes enacted changes in tax rates and laws in the period in which they occur. Deferred income tax expense results from changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities between periods. Deferred tax assets are recognized subject to the Company’s judgment that realization is more likely than not. A tax position that meets the more likely than not recognition threshold is measured to determine the amount of benefit to recognize. The tax position is measured at the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon settlement. Interest and penalties, if any, are recognized as a component of income tax expense.

 

The Company reviews the deferred tax assets for recoverability based on history of earnings, expectations for future earnings and expected timing of reversals of temporary differences. Realization of a deferred tax asset ultimately depends on the existence of sufficient taxable income available under tax law, including future reversals of existing temporary differences, future taxable income exclusive of reversing differences, taxable income in prior carryback years, projections of future operating results, cumulative tax losses over the past three years, tax loss deductibility limitations, and available tax planning strategies. If, based on available information, it is more likely than not that the deferred income tax asset will not be realized, a valuation allowance against the deferred tax asset must be established with a corresponding charge to income tax expense. The deferred tax assets and valuation allowance are evaluated each quarter, and a portion of the valuation allowance may be reversed in future periods. The determination of how much of the valuation allowance that may be reversed and the timing is based on future results of operation and the amount and timing of actual loan charge-offs and asset write-downs. At December 31, 2012 and 2011, the Company’s deferred tax asset was offset in its entirety by a valuation allowance.

 

The Company believes that its income tax filing positions taken or expected to be taken in its tax returns will more likely than not be sustained upon audit by the taxing authorities and does not anticipate any adjustments that will result in a material adverse impact on the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, or cash flow. Therefore no reserves for uncertain income tax positions have been recorded.

 

Advertising Expense - Advertising and public relations costs are generally expensed as incurred. External costs incurred in producing media advertising are expensed the first time the advertising takes place. External costs relating to direct mailing costs are expensed in the period in which the direct mailings are sent. Advertising and public relations costs of $22 thousand and $150 thousand were included in the Company’s results of operations in marketing and advertising expense for 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

Net Income (Loss) Per Common Share - Basic income (loss) per common share is calculated by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the year. Diluted net income per common share is computed based on net income divided by the weighted average number of common and potential common shares. The computation of diluted net loss per share does not include potential common shares as their effect would be anti-dilutive. The only potential common share equivalents are those related to the CPP Warrant, the effect of which is excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per common share as it would be antidilutive.

76
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 - ORGANIZATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - continued

 

Comprehensive Income - Accounting principles generally require recognized income, expenses, gains, and losses to be included in net income. Although certain changes in assets and liabilities, such as unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale securities, are reported as a separate component of the equity section of the balance sheet, such items, along with net income, are components of comprehensive income and are also presented in a separate statement of comprehensive income.

 

Statements of Cash Flows - For purposes of reporting cash flows, the Company considers certain highly liquid debt instruments purchased with a maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents include amounts due from banks, federal funds sold, and interest-bearing deposits with other banks.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Financial Instruments - In the ordinary course of business, the Company enters into off-balance sheet financial instruments consisting of commitments to extend credit and letters of credit. These financial instruments are recorded in the financial statements when they become payable by the customer.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements – The following is a summary of recent authoritative pronouncements.

 

The FASB amended the Comprehensive Income topic of the ASC in February 2013. The amendment addresses reporting of amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income. Specifically, the amendment does not change the current requirements for reporting net income or other comprehensive income in financial statements. However, the amendment does require an entity to provide information about the amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income by component. In addition, in certain circumstances an entity is required to present, either on the face of the statement where net income is presented or in the notes, significant amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income by the respective line items of net income. The amendment will be effective for the Company on a prospective basis for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2012. Early adoption is permitted. The Company does not expect the amendment to have a material effect on its financial statements.

 

Other accounting standards that have been issued or proposed by the FASB or other standards-setting bodies are not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Risks and Uncertainties - In the normal course of its business, the Company encounters two significant types of risks: economic and regulatory. There are three main components of economic risk: interest rate risk, credit risk and market risk. The Company is subject to interest rate risk to the degree that its interest-bearing liabilities mature or reprice at different speeds, or on different basis, than its interest-earning assets. Credit risk is the risk of default on the Company’s loan portfolio that results from a borrower’s inability or unwillingness to make contractually required payments. Market risk reflects changes in the value of collateral underlying loans receivable and the valuation of real estate held by the Company.

 

The Company is subject to the regulations of various governmental agencies. These regulations can and do change significantly from period to period. The Company also undergoes periodic examinations by the regulatory agencies, which may subject it to further changes with respect to asset valuations, amounts of required loss allowances and operating restrictions from the regulators’ judgments based on information available to them at the time of their examination.

 

77
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 - ORGANIZATION AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES - continued

 

Additionally, the Company is subject to certain regulations due to our participation in the CPP. Pursuant to the terms of the CPP Purchase Agreement between us and the Treasury, we adopted certain standards for executive compensation and corporate governance for the period during which the Treasury holds the equity issued pursuant to the CPP Purchase Agreement, including the common stock which may be issued pursuant to the CPP Warrant. These standards generally apply to our named executive officers. The standards include (1) ensuring that incentive compensation for senior executives does not encourage unnecessary and excessive risks that threaten the value of the financial institution; (2) required clawback of any bonus or incentive compensation paid to a senior executive based on statements of earnings, gains or other criteria that are later proven to be materially inaccurate; (3) prohibition on making golden parachute payments to senior executives; (4) prohibition on providing tax gross-up provisions; and (5) agreement not to deduct for tax purposes executive compensation in excess of $500 thousand for each senior executive. In particular, the change to the deductibility limit on executive compensation will likely increase the overall cost of our compensation programs in future periods and may make it more difficult to attract suitable candidates to serve as executive officers.

 

In February 2005 the Bank purchased a $500 thousand 15-year renewable and convertible term life insurance policy through Banner Life Insurance Company on the life of James R. Clarkson, President and CEO. The Bank is both the owner and the beneficiary of this key person policy. The purpose of securing this policy was to provide the Bank with financial protection in the event of the unexpected death of Mr. Clarkson and better enable the Bank to attract a qualified replacement for Mr. Clarkson in such a situation.

 

Legislation that has been adopted after we closed on our sale of Series T Preferred Stock and warrants to the Treasury for $12.9 million pursuant to the Capital Purchase Program on March 6, 2009, or any legislation or regulations that may be implemented in the future, may have a material impact on the terms of our Capital Purchase Program transaction with the Treasury.

 

Reclassifications - Certain captions and amounts in the 2011 financial statements were reclassified to conform to the 2012 presentation.

 

NOTE 2 – REGULATORY MATTERS AND FUTURE OPERATIONS

 

Consent Order with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and South Carolina Board of Financial Institutions

 

On February 10, 2011, the Bank entered into a Consent Order with the FDIC and the State Board. 

 

The Consent Order conveys specific actions needed to address the Bank’s current financial condition, primarily related to capital planning, liquidity/funds management, policy and planning issues, management oversight, loan concentrations and classifications, and non-performing loans. A summary of the requirements of the Consent Order and the Bank’s status on complying with the Consent Order is as follows:

78
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – REGULATORY MATTERS AND FUTURE OPERATIONS - continued

 

Requirements of the Consent Order Bank’s Compliance Status
Achieve and maintain, by July 10, 2011, Total Risk Based capital at least equal to 10% of risk-weighted assets and Tier 1 capital at least equal to 8% of total assets.

The Bank did not meet the capital ratios as specified in the Consent Order and, as a result, submitted a revised capital restoration plan to the FDIC on July 15, 2011. The revised capital restoration plan was determined by the FDIC to be insufficient and, as a result, we submitted a further revised capital restoration plan to the FDIC on September 30, 2011. We received the FDIC’s non-objection to the further revised capital restoration plan on December 6, 2011.

 

The Bank is working diligently to increase its capital ratios in order to strengthen its balance sheet and satisfy the commitments required under the Consent Order. The Bank has engaged independent third parties to assist the Bank in its efforts to increase its capital ratios. In addition to continuing to search for additional capital, the Bank is also searching for a potential merger partner. Although the Bank is pursuing both of these approaches simultaneously, given the lack of a market for bank mergers, particularly in the Southeast, as a result of the current economic and regulatory climate, and the lack of success the Company has had to date in attempting to raise capital, there can be no assurances the Company will either raise additional capital or find a merger partner.

 

Submit, by April 11, 2011, a written capital plan to the supervisory authorities.

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.

 

Establish, by March 12, 2011, a plan to monitor compliance with the Consent Order, which shall be monitored by the Bank’s Directors’ Committee.

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order. The Directors’ Committee meets monthly and each meeting includes reviews and discussions of all areas required in the Consent Order.

 

79
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – REGULATORY MATTERS AND FUTURE OPERATIONS - continued

 

Develop, by May 11, 2011, a written analysis and assessment of the Bank’s management and staffing needs.

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order. In 2011, the Bank engaged an independent third party to perform an assessment of the Bank’s staffing needs to ensure the Bank has an appropriate organizational structure with qualified management in place. The Board of Directors has reviewed all recommendations regarding the Bank’s organizational structure.

 

 

Notify the supervisory authorities in writing of the resignation or termination of any of the Bank’s directors or senior executive officers.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.
Eliminate, by March 12, 2011, by charge-off or collection, all assets or portions of assets classified “Loss” and 50% of those assets classified “Doubtful.” We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.

Review and update, by April 11, 2011, its policy to ensure the adequacy of the Bank’s allowance for loan and lease losses, which must provide for a review of the

Bank’s allowance for loan and lease losses at least once each calendar quarter.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.
Submit, by April 11, 2011, a written plan to the supervisory authorities to reduce classified assets, which shall include, among other things, a reduction of the Bank’s risk exposure in relationships with assets in excess of $750,000 which are criticized as “Substandard” or “Doubtful”. In accordance with the approved plan, reduce assets classified in the June 30, 2010 Report of Examination by 65% by August 11, 2012 and by 75% by February 9, 2013.

We are not in compliance with this provision of the Consent Order. The written plan was submitted and approved; however, assets classified in the June 30, 2010 Report of Examination had only been reduced by 58.1% as of December 31, 2012.

 

Revise, by April 11, 2011, its policies and procedures for managing the Bank’s Adversely Classified Other Real Estate Owned.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.

80
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – REGULATORY MATTERS AND FUTURE OPERATIONS - continued

 

Not extend any additional credit to any borrower who has a loan or other extension of credit from the Bank that has been charged-off or classified, in whole or in part, “Loss” or “Doubtful” and is uncollected. In addition, the Bank may not extend any additional credit to any borrower who has a loan or other extension of credit from the Bank that has been criticized, in whole or in part, “Substandard” and is uncollected, unless the Bank’s board of directors determines that failure to extend further credit to a particular borrower would be detrimental to the best interests of the Bank.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.  In the second quarter of 2010, the Bank engaged the services of an independent firm to perform an extensive review of the Bank’s credit portfolio and help management implement a more comprehensive lending and collection policy and more enhanced loan review.  An independent review of the Bank’s credit portfolio was most recently completed in the third quarter of 2012.

Perform, by April 11, 2011, a risk segmentation analysis with respect to the Bank’s Concentrations of Credit and develop a written plan to systematically reduce any segment of the portfolio that is an undue concentration of credit.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.
Review, by April 11, 2011 and annually thereafter, the Bank’s loan policies and procedures for adequacy and, based upon this review, make all appropriate revisions to the policies and procedures necessary to enhance the Bank’s lending functions and ensure their implementation.

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order. As noted above, the Bank engaged the services of an independent firm to perform an extensive review of the Bank’s credit portfolio and help management implement a more comprehensive lending and collection policy and more enhanced loan review.

 

Adopt, by May 11, 2011, an effective internal loan review and grading system to provide for the periodic review of the Bank’s loan portfolio in order to identify and categorize the Bank’s loans, and other extensions of credit which are carried on the Bank’s books as loans, on the basis of credit quality.

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order. As noted above, the Bank engaged the services of an independent firm to perform an extensive review of the Bank’s credit portfolio and help management implement a more comprehensive lending and collection policy and more enhanced loan review.

 

81
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – REGULATORY MATTERS AND FUTURE OPERATIONS - continued

 

Review and update, by May 11, 2011, its written profit plan to ensure the Bank has a realistic, comprehensive budget for all categories of income and expense, which must address, at minimum, goals and strategies for improving and sustaining the earnings of the Bank, the major areas in and means by which the Bank will seek to improve the Bank’s operating performance, realistic and comprehensive budgets, a budget review process to monitor income and expenses of the Bank to compare actual results with budgetary projections, assess that operating assumptions that form the basis for budget projections and adequately support major projected income and expense components of the plan, and coordination of the Bank’s loan, investment, and operating policies and budget and profit planning with the funds management policy.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.  The Bank engaged an independent third party to assist management with a strategic plan to help restructure its balance sheet, increase capital ratios, return to profitability and maintain adequate liquidity.  
Review and update, by May 11, 2011, its written plan addressing liquidity, contingent funding, and asset liability management.

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order. In 2011, the Bank engaged an independent third party to assist management in its development of a strategic plan that achieves all requirements of the Consent Order. The strategic plan reflects the Bank’s plans to restructure its balance sheet, increase capital ratios, return to profitability, and maintain adequate liquidity. The Board of Directors has reviewed and adopted the Bank’s strategic plan.

 

Eliminate, by March 12, 2011, all violations of law and regulation or contraventions of policy set forth in the FDIC’s safety and soundness examination of the Bank in November 2009.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.

Not accept, renew, or rollover any brokered deposits unless it is in compliance with the requirements of 12 C.F.R. § 337.6(b).

 

Since entering into the Consent Order, the Bank has not accepted, renewed, or rolled-over any brokered deposits.
Limit asset growth to 5% per annum.

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.

 

82
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – REGULATORY MATTERS AND FUTURE OPERATIONS - continued

 

Not declare or pay any dividends or bonuses or make any distributions of interest, principal, or other sums on subordinated debentures without the prior approval of the supervisory authorities.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.

The Bank shall comply with the restrictions on the effective yields on deposits as described in 12 C.F.R. § 337.6.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order.

Furnish, by March 12, 2011 and within 30 days of the end of each quarter thereafter, written progress reports to the supervisory authorities detailing the form and manner of any actions taken to secure compliance with the Consent Order.

 

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order, and we have submitted the required progress reports to the supervisory authorities.

 

Submit, by March 12, 2011, a written plan to the supervisory authorities for eliminating its reliance on brokered deposits.

 

We believe we have complied with the provision of the Consent Order.
Adopt, by April 11, 2011, an employee compensation plan after undertaking an independent review of compensation paid to all of the Bank’s senior executive officers. We believe we have complied with the provision of the Consent Order.
Prepare and submit, by May 11, 2011, its written strategic plan to the supervisory authorities.

We believe we have complied with this provision of the Consent Order. In 2011, the Bank engaged an independent third party to assist management in its development of a strategic plan that achieves all requirements of the Consent Order. The Board of Directors has reviewed and adopted the Bank’s strategic plan.

 

 

There can be no assurance that the Bank will be able to comply fully with the provisions of the Consent Order, and the determination of the Bank’s compliance will be made by the FDIC and the State Board. However, we believe we are currently in substantial compliance with the Consent Order except for the requirements to achieve and maintain Total Risk Based capital at least equal to 10% of risk-weighted assets and Tier 1 capital at least equal to 8% of total assets. Should we fail to comply with the capital requirements in the Consent Order, or suffer a continued deterioration in our financial condition, the Bank may be placed into a federal conservatorship or receivership by the FDIC, with the FDIC appointed as conservator or receiver. In addition, the supervisory authorities may amend the Consent Order based on the results of their ongoing examinations.

 

83
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – REGULATORY MATTERS AND FUTURE OPERATIONS - continued

 

As of December 31, 2012, the Company and the Bank were categorized as “critically undercapitalized”. Our losses during over the past three years have materially adversely impacted our capital. As a result, we have been pursuing a plan through which to achieve the capital requirements set forth under the Consent Order which includes, among other things, the sale of assets, reduction in total assets, and reduction of overhead expenses, as well as raising additional capital at either the Bank or the holding company level and attempting to find a merger partner for the Company or the Bank.

 

We anticipate that we will need to raise a material amount of capital to return the Bank to an adequate level of capitalization and have been exploring a number of potential sources of capital. We have not had any success to date in raising this capital, and there are no assurances that we will be able to raise this capital on a timely basis or at all.

 

We are also working to improve asset quality and to reduce the Bank’s investment in commercial real estate loans as a percentage of Tier 1 capital. The Company is reducing its reliance on brokered deposits and is committed to improving the Bank’s capital position.

 

Written Agreement

 

On May 9, 2011, the Company entered into a Written Agreement with the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.  The Written Agreement is designed to enhance the Company’s ability to act as a source of strength to the Bank.

  

The Written Agreement contains provisions similar to those in the Bank’s Consent Order. Specifically, pursuant to the Written Agreement, the Company agreed, among other things, to seek the prior written approval of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond before undertaking any of the following activities:

 

·declaring or paying any dividends,
·directly or indirectly taking dividends or any other form of payment representing a reduction in capital from the Bank,
·making any distributions of interest, principal or other sums on subordinated debentures or trust preferred securities,
·directly or indirectly, incurring, increasing or guarantying any debt, and
·directly or indirectly, purchasing or redeeming any shares of its stock.

 

The Company also agreed to comply with certain notice provisions set forth in the Federal Deposit Insurance Act and regulations of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”) in appointing any new director or senior executive officer, or changing the responsibilities of any senior executive officer so that the officer would assume a different senior executive officer position.  The Company is also required to comply with certain restrictions on indemnification and severance payments pursuant to the Federal Deposit Insurance Act and FDIC regulations.

 

We believe we are currently in substantial compliance with the Written Agreement.

 

Future Operations

 

The going concern assumption is a fundamental principle in the preparation of financial statements. It is the responsibility of management to assess the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. In assessing this assumption, the Company has taken into account all available information about the future, which is at least, but is not limited to, twelve months from the balance sheet date of December 31, 2012. The Company had a history of profitable operations and sufficient sources of liquidity to meet its short-term and long-term funding needs. However, the Bank’s financial condition has suffered during the past few years from the extraordinary effects of what may ultimately be the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression.

84
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – REGULATORY MATTERS AND FUTURE OPERATIONS - continued

 

The effects of the current economic environment are being felt across many industries, with financial services and residential real estate being particularly hard hit. The Bank, with a loan portfolio consisting of a concentration in commercial real estate loans, has seen a decline in the value of the collateral securing its portfolio as well as rapid deterioration in its borrowers’ cash flow and ability to repay their outstanding loans to the Bank. As a result, the Bank’s level of nonperforming assets increased substantially during 2010 and 2011. However, the Bank’s nonperforming assets began to stabilize during 2012, as the Bank’s nonperforming assets equaled $72.2 million, or 15.39% of assets, as of December 31, 2012 as compared to $86.9 million, or 16.22% of assets, as of December 31, 2011. While management recognizes the possibility of further deterioration in the loan portfolio, net loan charge-offs also decreased slightly from 2011 to 2012. For the year ended December 31, 2012, we recorded net loan charge-offs of $17.6 million, or 5.20% of average loans, as compared to net loan charge-offs of $18.6 million, or 4.53% of average loans, for the year ended December 31, 2011.

 

The Company and the Bank operate in a highly regulated industry and must plan for the liquidity needs of each entity separately. A variety of sources of liquidity have historically been available to the Bank to meet its short-term and long-term funding needs. Although a number of these sources have been limited following execution of the Consent Order, management has prepared forecasts of these sources of funds and the Bank’s projected uses of funds during 2012 in an effort to ensure that the sources available are sufficient to meet the Bank’s projected liquidity needs for this period.

 

Prior to the economic downturn, the Company, if needed, would have relied on dividends from the Bank as its primary source of liquidity. Currently, however, the Company has no available sources of liquidity. The Company is a legal entity separate and distinct from the Bank. Various legal limitations restrict the Bank from lending or otherwise supplying funds to the Company to meet its obligations, including paying dividends. In addition, the terms of the Consent Order described below further limits the Bank’s ability to pay dividends to the Company to satisfy its funding needs. Unless the Company is able to raise capital, it will have no means of satisfying its funding needs.

 

Management believes the Bank’s liquidity sources are adequate to meet its needs for at least the next 12 months, but if the Bank is unable to meet its liquidity needs, then the Bank may be placed into a federal conservatorship or receivership by the FDIC, with the FDIC appointed conservator or receiver.

 

The Company will also need to raise substantial additional capital to increase the Bank’s capital levels to meet the standards set forth by the FDIC. As a result of the recent downturn in the financial markets and the financial condition of the Company and the Bank, the availability of capital has become significantly restricted or has become increasingly costly as compared to the prevailing market rates prior to the volatility. Management cannot predict when or if the capital markets will return to more favorable conditions. Management is actively evaluating a number of capital sources, asset reductions and other balance sheet management strategies to ensure that the Bank’s projected level of regulatory capital can support its balance sheet. Receivership by the FDIC is based on the Bank’s capital ratios rather than those of the Company. As of December 31, 2012, the Bank is categorized as critically undercapitalized.

 

There can be no assurances that the Company or the Bank will be able to raise additional capital. An equity financing transaction by the Company would result in substantial dilution to the Company’s current shareholders and could adversely affect the market price of the Company’s common stock. Likewise, an equity financing transaction by the Bank would result in substantial dilution to the Company’s ownership interest in the Bank. It is difficult to predict if these efforts will be successful, either on a short-term or long-term basis. Should these efforts be unsuccessful, the Company would be unable to realize its assets and discharge its liabilities in the normal course of business.

 

85
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 2 – REGULATORY MATTERS AND FUTURE OPERATIONS - continued

 

As a result of management’s assessment of the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern, the accompanying consolidated financial statements for the Company have been prepared on a going concern basis, which contemplates the realization of assets and the discharge of liabilities in the normal course of business for the foreseeable future, and does not include any adjustments to reflect the possible future effects on the recoverability or classification of assets in the event the Bank is unable to maintain regulatory capital at certain levels.

 

NOTE 3 - CASH AND DUE FROM BANKS

 

The Bank is required by regulation to maintain an average cash reserve balance based on a percentage of deposits. At December 31, 2012 and 2011, the requirements were satisfied by amounts on deposit with the Federal Reserve Bank and cash on hand.

 

NOTE 4 - INVESTMENT SECURITIES

 

Securities available-for-sale consisted of the following:

 

   Amortized  Gross Unrealized  Estimated
(Dollars in thousands)  Cost  Gains  Losses  Fair Value
December 31, 2012                    
  Government-sponsored enterprises  $27,024   $111   $(27)  $27,108 
  Mortgage-backed securities   44,557    391    (486)   44,462 
  Obligations of state and local governments   5,569    193    (12)   5,750 
      Total  $77,150   $695   $(525)  $77,320 
                     
December 31, 2011                    
  Government-sponsored enterprises  $42,010   $165   $(33)  $42,142 
  Mortgage-backed securities   50,706    177    (3,677)   47,206 
  Obligations of state and local governments   10,302    558    (1)   10,859 
      Total  $103,018   $900   $(3,711)  $100,207 

 

The following is a summary of maturities of securities available-for-sale as of December 31, 2012. The amortized cost and estimated fair values are based on the contractual maturity dates. Actual maturities may differ from contractual maturities because borrowers may have the right to call or prepay obligations with or without penalty.

 

   Securities
Available-For-Sale
   Amortized  Estimated
(Dollars in thousands)  Cost  Fair Value
       
Due after one year but within five years  $—     $—   
Due after five years but within ten years   10,221    10,440 
Due after ten years   66,929    66,880 
    Total  $77,150   $77,320 

 

 

86
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 4 - INVESTMENT SECURITIES - continued

 

The following table shows gross unrealized losses and fair value, aggregated by investment category, and length of time that individual securities have been in a continuous unrealized loss position, at:

 

   December 31, 2012
   Less than twelve months  Twelve months or more  Total
   Fair  Unrealized  Fair  Unrealized  Fair  Unrealized
(Dollars in thousands)  Value  Losses  Value  Losses  Value  Losses
Government-sponsored enterprises  $6,003   $(27)  $—     $—     $6,003   $(27)
Mortgage-backed securities   9,881    (380)   5,299    (106)   15,180    (486)
Obligations of state and local governments   635    (12)   —      —      635    (12)
    Total  $16,519   $(419)  $5,299   $(106)  $21,818   $(525)

 

   December 31, 2011
   Less than twelve months  Twelve months or more  Total
   Fair  Unrealized  Fair  Unrealized  Fair  Unrealized
(Dollars in thousands)  Value  Losses  Value  Losses  Value  Losses
Government-sponsored enterprises  $11,967   $(33)  $—     $—     $11,967   $(33)
Mortgage-backed securities   17,653    (1,132)   20,750    (2,545)   38,403    (3,677)
Obligations of state and local governments   1,576    (1)   —      —      1,576    (1)
    Total  $31,196   $(1,166)  $20,750   $(2,545)  $51,946   $(3,711)

 

Management evaluates its investment portfolio periodically to identify any impairment that is other than temporary. At December 31, 2012, the Company had 3 mortgage-backed securities that have been in an unrealized loss position for more than twelve months. Management believes these losses are temporary and are a result of the current interest rate environment. The Company does not intend to sell these securities and it is more likely than not that the Company will not be required to sell these securities before recovery of their amortized cost.

 

At December 31, 2012 and 2011, investment securities with a book value of $30.4 million and $40.9 million, respectively, and a market value of $30.6 million and $40.5 million, respectively, were pledged to secure deposits. During 2012 and 2011, the Company decreased its investment securities portfolio as part of its overall strategy to reduce the Bank’s assets.

 

Proceeds from sales of available-for-sale securities were $46.7 million and $181.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. Gross realized gains and losses on sales of available-for-sale securities for the years ended were as follows (in thousands):

 

   Years ended December 31,
   2012  2011
Gross realized gains  $1,643   $3,217 
Gross realized losses   —      (265)
  Net gain  $1,643   $2,952 

87
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 5 – LOAN PORTFOLIO

 

Loans consisted of the following:

 

   December 31,
(Dollars in thousands)  2012  2011
Residential  $91,606   $163,502 
Commercial Real Estate   161,335    142,485 
Commercial   41,200    52,273 
Consumer   8,093    8,735 
    Total gross loans  $302,234   $366,995 

 

Certain parties (principally certain directors and officers of the Company, their immediate families, and business interests) were loan customers and had other transactions in the normal course of business with the Company. Related party loans are made on substantially the same terms, including interest rates and collateral, as those prevailing at the time for comparable transactions with unrelated persons and do not involve more than normal risk of collectibility. Related party loans consisted of the following:

 

   For the Year ended December 31,
(Dollars in thousands)  2012  2011
       
Beginning balance  $4,325   $12,208 
  New loans and advances   1,645    1,752 
  Repayments   (3,103)   (4,423)
  Relationship changes   —      (5,212)
Ending balance  $2,867   $4,325 

 

Provision and Allowance for Loan Losses

 

An allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level deemed appropriate by management to adequately provide for known and inherent losses in the loan portfolio. The allowance for loan losses is established as losses are estimated to have occurred through a provision for loan losses charged to earnings. Loan losses are charged against the allowance when management believes the uncollectability of a loan balance is confirmed. Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the allowance.

 

In evaluating the adequacy of the Company’s loan loss reserves, management identifies loans believed to be impaired. Impaired loans are those not likely to be repaid as to principal and interest in accordance with the terms of the loan agreement. Impaired loans are reviewed individually by management and the net present value of the collateral is estimated. Reserves are maintained for each loan in which the principal balance of the loan exceeds the net present value of the collateral. In addition to the specific allowance for individually reviewed loans, a general allowance for potential loan losses is established based on management’s review of the composition of the loan portfolio with the purpose of identifying any concentrations of risk, and an analysis of historical loan charge-offs and recoveries. The final component of the allowance for loan losses incorporates management’s evaluation of current economic conditions and other risk factors which may impact the inherent losses in the loan portfolio. These evaluations are highly subjective and require that a great degree of judgmental assumptions be made by management. This component of the allowance for loan losses includes additional estimated reserves for internal factors such as changes in lending staff, loan policy and underwriting guidelines, and loan seasoning and quality, and external factors such as national and local economic trends and conditions.

 

88
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 5 - LOAN PORTFOLIO - continued

 

The following table details the activity within our allowance for loan losses as of December 31, 2012 and 2011, by portfolio segment:

 

December 31, 2012

(Dollars in thousands)

      Commercial         
   Commercial  Real Estate  Consumer  Residential  Total
Allowance for loan losses:                         
  Beginning balance  $3,239   $10,240   $103   $7,596   $21,178 
Charge-offs   (3,242)   (10,045)   (106)   (5,148)   (18,541)
Recoveries   284    331    12    356    983 
Provision   1,701    7,061    115    1,653    10,530 
  Ending balance  $1,982   $7,587   $124   $4,457   $14,150 
                          
  Ending balances:                         
Individually evaluated for impairment  $833   $3,499   $15   $1,236   $5,583 
Collectively evaluated for impairment  $1,149   $4,088   $109   $3,221   $8,567 
                          
Loans receivable:                         
                          
  Ending balance, total  $41,200   $161,335   $8,093   $91,606   $302,234 
                          
  Ending balances:                         
Individually evaluated for impairment  $4,957   $45,208   $239   $11,179   $61,583 
Collectively evaluated for impairment  $36,243   $116,127   $7,854   $80,427   $240,651 

 

 

89
 

HCSB FINANCIAL CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARY

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

NOTE 5 - LOAN PORTFOLIO - continued

 

December 31, 2011

(Dollars in thousands)

      Commercial